Top 53 Places to visit in Rome

Page 1 of 1 in Rome

Best things to do in Rome and sightseeing in Rome

Colosseum - Rome

Colosseum is the largest amphitheatre ever built. Its huge and fascinating. It looks beautiful at both daytime and during night.
Lipsita Singh

78 Followers, 5 Reviews


The Colosseum - An arena of blood and war; A place where superstar Gladiators used to fight for the ultimate battle of life and death. This is in fact one of the best preserved monuments of ancient Rome. This breathtaking memorial is capable of spacing more than a fifty thousand spectators at any given point of time and is a true Roman engineering ingenious. Location : Piazza del Colosseo, 1, 00184 Roma, Italy Timings : 8:30 AM – 7:00 PM All days Admission Fee : €15.50
Karthik Rao V

371 Followers, 70 Reviews


Fascinating!
Sakshi Prakash

277 Followers, 36 Reviews


Trevi Fountain - Rome

The world might not be a wish granting factory but if legends and a million other travellers are to be believed, the Trevi Fountain definitely is. A brilliant example of the Baroque style of architecture, the mythical figures on the fountain are magnificent. The name 'Trevi' indicates the three roads that meet at the fountain which has found place in dozens of popular films. As much as I wanted to throw a coin into the water in order to ensure a second trip to Rome, the restoration work initiated by the fashion house Fendi prevented me from doing so and all that I got to see were scaffolds and glass barriers. Therefore, find out the status well in advance, the evening is the best time to visit and there is no ticket that you need to purchase. Getting there: If in case you are not living near the Tridente area which is walking distance (albeit long) from the fountain, taking the underground metro is the best idea because it is faster and cheaper. The tickets come for about 1.5 Euros and can be bought from the several machines or ticketing counters at the station. Your stop is 'Barberini' along the A Line and Trevi is about 600 metres from the metro station. Beware of pickpockets on the train.
Sumedha Bharpilania

1k+ Followers, 140 Reviews


Those are not fountains- they are free artworks!
Elena

183 Followers, 29 Reviews


The Trevi Fountain was a five-minute walk away from our hotel. Legend says that if you make three wishes and throw a coin into the fountain, all your wishes come true. It also means that the person will definitely come back to Rome. It is like forming a lifelong magical bond with the city. The Trevi Fountain was crowded with tourists from all over the world. There were pretty cafes and restaurants surrounding the place. It is a magnificent piece of architecture; one cannot help but feel a little intimidated. Oceanus, the God of all water is depicted in the center. I felt like a tiny speck in front of the colossal edifice.
Ashmita Das

134 Followers, 7 Reviews


Roman Forum - Rome

Right beside the site of the Colosseum, towards the west lies the remains of the Roman Forum. While it’s one of the oldest yet has exceedingly become the most significant historical as well as architectural landmarks of ancient Rome. Structurally, it’s a rectangular plaza, perimetered with ruins of the most important state and government buildings. As you visit this historic heritage site, you’ll realize how the ever-spoken political public life ran in a day in Rome. And it’s very walls and pillars speak aloud of the origins of present day political thoughts and ideologies of liberalism, democracy, state, and even citizenship! Having been an important part of the popular public life, it stood testimony especially to processions, trails, meetings, speeches, elections and gladiator matches. It is also known to have enshrined Roman Gods & Goddesses, alongside the house of The Senate of Roman city states, which eventually gave birth to the Republican government in Rome. Although visibly in ruins, the Roman Forum resonates the architectural marvels, debatable political past and grandeur culture that ancient Rome was.
Giuseppe

139 Followers, 3 Reviews


West of the Colosseum lies one of the oldest yet most important architectural landmarks of ancient Rome- The Roman Forum. It is a rectangular plaza, marked with ruins of some important government buildings of ancient Rome, making it an important part of the popular public life, especially pertaining with processions, trails, meetings, speeches, elections and gladiator matches. It is also known to have enshrined Roman Gods & Goddesses, alongside the house of The Senate of Roman city states, which eventually gave birth to the Republican government in Rome. Structure built by the great Julius Caesar and his likewise successors still stand tall for numerous archaeological speculation even today. Although visibly in ruins, the Roman Forum resonates the architectural marvels, debatable political past and grandeur culture that ancient Rome was.
Sergio Grom

179 Followers, 9 Reviews


Located in the small valley between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, stands a structure of great historical importance called the Forum. Originally a marketplace, this site was then used for elections, criminal trials and gladiatorial matches. Many of the oldest and most important structures of the ancient city were located here and hence proved to be an excellent excavation ground. Many temples and shrines were based here. The Senate and the Republic government began on the same grounds. You can see the ruins of Basilica Julia which was built by Julius Caesar some 130 years ago. Within Roman Forum, three out of the forty triumphal arches are still holding on to their roots. These are Arch of Titus, Arch of Septimius Severus, and the foundations of the arches of Augustus. The survival of these arches has inspired many Roman rulers to erect their own arches. The first recorded Roman triumphal arches were set up at the time of the Roman Republic. One must see these arches for their intricate carvings and sculpted aids. You can discover the Etruscan monarchy, law and order in Republican Rome. Just 40 m away is Palatine Hill, where according to Roman mythology, was the location of the cave, known as the Lupercal, where Romulus and Remus were found by the she-wolf that kept them alive. It is also the center most of the Seven Hills of Rome. In its time, the Hill was also the site of the festival of the Lupercalia.
Robert Coghlan

114 Followers, 5 Reviews


Pantheon - Rome

What was once a temple dedicated to the Classical Gods, the Pantheon (A derivation of the Greek words 'pan' meaning all and 'theos' meaning God) is now a 2000 year old church, a conversion which, excuse my joke, our current government would not really approve of. Despite a dull and ageing exterior with its giant Corinthian columns, this monument will delight you the moment you step through the humongous bronze doors and look at the largest and probably the most beautiful reinforced concrete dome in the world. It might interest you to know that both light which marks an emblematic connection with the Gods and rainwater can seep through the oculus of the dome and there are 22 invisible holes in the sloping marble floor to drain the water away. And we consider ourselves advanced! The Pantheon will disappoint you first and then suddenly mesmerize you, also because one of the greatest artists to have ever lived, Raphael, is buried here. Getting there: If in case you are not living near the Centro Storico area which is walking distance from the Pantheon on Piazza della Rotonda, taking the underground metro is the best idea because it is faster and cheaper. The tickets come for about 1.5 Euros and can be bought from the several machines or ticketing counters at the station. Your stop is 'Spagna' along the A Line and the Pantheon is a bit of a walk, about a kilometre from the station. Beware of pickpockets on the train. You could even take a bus from the Termini Station. Pantheon is open from 8:30 am till 7:30 in the evening and the entry is absolutely free.
Sumedha Bharpilania

1k+ Followers, 140 Reviews


Anyone who knows me or who has met me or has talked to me about Rome knows that this is my favorite spot in the whole of Rome, probably my favorite monument from all of ancient history except maybe the Parthenon….. But it is truly a must see. I could probably do five reasons why I love the Pantheon alone but I will restrain myself. The main reason you should go see it is because it was built in the 120’sAD and it is to this day the largest free standing concrete dome in the world and NO ONE knows how Hadrian built, even Michelangelo couldn’t figure it out. So it is obviously awesome.
Ashley & Alex

205 Followers, 19 Reviews


Pantheon is one of the iconic buildings of Rome. It was built under the reign of Augustus as a temple to all the Gods of Ancient Rome. It is one of the oldest and best preserved structures of Rome. It is one such place that has been in use for the longest time in Roman history. A classic example of Ancient Roman architecture mixed with tradition.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Vatican Museums - Rome

Housing a wonderful collection of renowned classical masterpieces, The Vatican Museums display some of the finest works of Renaissance art illustrating their excellence in arts and paintings. Founded in the late 1600's this museum attracts close to 5 million tourists every year making it one of the most visited museums in the world. Some of the notable galleries are Greek Cross Gallery, Gallery of the Statues, Cabinet of the Masks and the Sala delle Muse. Location : Viale Vaticano, 00165 Roma, Italy Contact : +39 06 6988 3332 Timings : 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM except Sundays
Karthik Rao V

371 Followers, 70 Reviews


If the term 'rich' can be attributed to museums, it probably is because of the existence of the Vatican Museums. Home to the greatest collection of art in the world, the Vatican Museums, founded by the 16th Century Pope Julius II and expanded by his successors, are gold mines in their own right. The exhibits that include several galleries (about 50), halls and three courtyards, extend up to 7 kilometres and house several works of Michelangelo and Raphael. The displays range from the most exquisite paintings to ceiling frescoes inside the Sistine Chapel and even Egyptian mummies. Getting There: Entry to the Vatican Museums comes for about 16 Euros and after a lot of frisking courtesy the security, you are handed your audio guides which come for a price of 7 Euros and are highly recommended. The queues can be long so book your tickets online if you are in a hurry. The museums are open from 9am to 6pm with 4pm being the last admission. Additionally, entry is free on the last Sunday of the month. As previously stated, there are several galleries to see in the museums and there is only one direction that everybody follows so do not be intimidated, you will not get lost. You could take the Metro to 'Ottaviano-San Pietro' which is on the A Line of the Rome Metropolitan and your journey to the Vatican and back should cost you 3 Euros. Beware of pickpockets. The museums are located 900 metres from the station and noon is the best time to visit.
Sumedha Bharpilania

1k+ Followers, 140 Reviews


It all looks as if Catholic priests wanted to learn as much as they possibly could from pagans, just look inside the Vatican Museum- it’s full of stolen pagan artefacts from all over the World.
Elena

183 Followers, 29 Reviews


Palatine Hill - Rome

Highly regarded and revered in the legends of Rome’s history and mythology, Palatine Hill is the center most of the seven hills on which Rome was built. Legends speak boastfully about the founding of Rome through the story of Romulus and Remus. Even famous senators such as Augustus Caesar are said to have lived on this hill, deriving the word “palace” from Palatine. The Domitian’s imperial palace constitutes most of the land on the hill, alongside a museum that houses many precious artifacts from Rome’s glorious ancient past.
Giuseppe

139 Followers, 3 Reviews


Regarded highly in the legends encircling Rome’s history and mythology, Palatine Hill is the center most of the seven hills on which Rome was built. Legends tell us how Romulus and Remus (the legendary founders of Rome) were found on this hill top by the She-wolf who raised them. Famous senators such as Augustus Caesar are said to have lived on this hill, deriving the word “palace” from Palatine. Used for around 300-350 years, the Domitian’s imperial palace covers most of the hill, alongside a museum that houses many precious artifacts from Rome’s glorious ancient past.
Sergio Grom

179 Followers, 9 Reviews


It is the centermost of the famous seven hills of Rome. The Palatine Hill is littered with ruins of palaces and stadiums. Since most of the hill is an excavation site, a good way to understand its significance would be to visit the Palatine Antiquarian Museum on Domitian's Palace.
Maria Rosaria Moscato

160 Followers, 36 Reviews


Piazza Navona - Rome

Another open space where the ancient Romans assimilated to watch games and get some entertainment. Today holding three magnificent fountains and a beautiful church, this square is considered to be one of the best in Rome. A major highlight here is the Fountain of Four Rivers (mentioned in Dan Brown's Angels and Demons) designed by Bernini. This fountain has a statue signifying the four major rivers, Danube, Ganges, Nile and Rio De La Plata.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


This is a world famous city square, usually crowded, yet one of the most picturesque parts of the city. Made on the site of the Stadium of Domitian, Piazza Navona encompasses three fountains, namely the Fount of the Four Rivers, Neptune Fountain, and the Moor Fountain. It is also a favourite tourist spot for its street culture and the little cafe outlets in the alleys and cobbled lanes that stream out of this Piazza.
Sergio Grom

179 Followers, 9 Reviews


Go to Piazza Navona, where you’ll find giant frittelle doughnuts and Sicilian puppets that make special presents. Visit the fashionable thoroughfare of Via Condotti, studded with high-end boutiques like Gucci, Celine, Dior and Ferragamo. If you’ve got old souls on your gift list, the nearby Via Margutta and Via del Babuino are known for their antiques.
Ashmi

372 Followers, 56 Reviews


Spanish Steps - Rome

The legendary Spanish Steps were on the way to our hotel. I’ve always pictured it in a certain way, after watching the film “Roman Holiday”. I had to make the chauffeur stop the car. The thrill of walking up and down those steps is inexplicable. I half expected to bump into Gregory Peck. There was an aura of romanticism surrounding the place. There were couples sitting on the steps, absolutely unaware of their surroundings. It was crowded, but so very beautiful.
Ashmita Das

134 Followers, 7 Reviews


A set of 135 steps that lead directly to the Bourbon Spanish Embassy are the Spanish Steps. Designed by architects Francesco de Sanctis and Alessandro Specchi, these steps are a favorite place to hang out for tourists and locals alike. At the foot of these steps is the Piazza De Spagna and on the top is an elegant and splendid Church. On the whole it is a great start to a tour full of architectural and historic charm.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


The widest staircase in Europe, the Spanish Steps has 135 steps and was designed by architects Francesco de Sanctis and Alessandro Specchi.
Maria Rosaria Moscato

160 Followers, 36 Reviews


Vatican Museums & the Sistine Chapel - Rome

These museums within the Vatican are a much envied store house of the most treasured artistic works such as paintings and sculptures, dating back to the Renaissance. Having being founded in the early 16th century, the Vatican museums along with the 64 galleries are more than 500 years old. Not only thousands, but millions of tourists visit these museums each year, in reverence and aww of such artistic excellence. The Sistine Chapel, famously known for its ceiling having been painted by Michelangelo, is undoubtedly the most renowned living memory of Renaissance Art across the world. Besides this, Raphael’s Stanza Della Segnatura is also quite popular here. This visit truly marks the quintessence of art in Rome.
Sergio Grom

179 Followers, 9 Reviews


The museums of the Vatican are by far the best place to experience Renaissance art. A collection that has taken over five centuries to build, it houses 54 galleries, the last being the Sistine Chapel, the roof of which has been designed by Michelangelo. To get here, one must go through the previous 53 galleries, which, given the objects of beauty placed within them, is something nobody would object to.
Maria Rosaria Moscato

160 Followers, 36 Reviews


Castel Sant'Angelo - Rome

The Mausoleum of Hadrian, or known as the Castel Sant'Angelo, is one of Rome's wonderful monuments and a powerful guardian of one of the most sacred places in the city. During the medieval times, many famous Roman rulers fought for the control of this castle as it played a prominent defensive role in many major Roman attacks. Location : Lungotevere Castello, 50, 00193 Roma, Italy Contact : 390632810 Opening Hours : 9:00 AM to 7:30 PM Except Sundays
Karthik Rao V

371 Followers, 70 Reviews


We wandered around a bit, looked and took pictures before we went back to the hotel.
wtraveltogether.com

144 Followers, 18 Reviews


Piazza del Popolo - Rome

Guarded by a giant obelisk in the centre and flanked by churches, gardens and the artist Bernini's works, the spectacular Piazza Del Popolo is supposed to be the entrance to the North of Rome. This 'square of the people' was initially used for public executions but is now frequented by young Romans looking for a good time. This place is all the more important because three streets (Via di Ripetta, Via del Corso, Via del Babuino) form a 'Tridente' by emanating from the piazza. There are cafes on the piazza that would gladly welcome you if you are looking for beverages or a light, authentic Italian dinner. Getting there: The best way to get to the Piazza del Popolo is by taking the underground metro because it is faster, cheaper and your station 'Flaminio' along the A line is directly across the street. The tickets come for about 1.5 Euros and can be bought from the several machines or ticketing counters at the station. Beware of pickpockets.
Sumedha Bharpilania

1k+ Followers, 140 Reviews


This huge square also called as the "People's Square" used to be the gateway into Rome. In ancient times the Via Flaminia was one of the important road links to Rome and gave the visitors a direct entry into the Piazza Del Popolo. Assuming the place's significance and as a show of Roman greatness to the visitor's that would enter pope Pius IV commissioned architect Nanni di Baccio Bigio to build a huge gate called Porta Flaminia. There is also a tall obelisk constructed by Augustus. The square has been a center of many activities in Ancient Rome including public executions.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Ostia Antica - Rome

Take a private tour of this once lively harbor town dating to the 4th century B.C. Ancient Ostia is often compared to Pompeii due to the amazing preservation of its buildings. Take a walk among ancient taverns, baths, apartments, markets, and theaters.
Tiziana Gargaro

146 Followers, 8 Reviews


Trastevere - Rome

Trastevere. Where would romans be without this neighborhood? Located on just the other side of the Tiber, Trastevere is “where real Romans go” or at least thats what all the guidebooks say. And to be fair a lot of Romans go here but then again so do study abroads and tourists, but there is a reason. Its a great neighborhood. Some of my favorite restaurants are located here and also my favorite place to get shots that are served in chocolate cups. Its a great area that really has what you want in Rome, great food, great nightlife and medieval streets with quaint cobblestone streets that will give you a twisted ankle if you aren’t careful.
Ashley & Alex

205 Followers, 19 Reviews


Underground - Rome

A major portion of ancient Rome lies in deep slumber about 9 and 15 meters underground. With less scope of excavation in the deeper sections we have to rely on the catacombs, scavi, and crypts on religious sites to decipher the life in classical times. The famous Catacombs of Rome are the ancient burial places which are made of underground passages. The original Roman custom was cremation, after which the burnt remains were kept in a pot. But around the 2nd century AD, burial of unbound was being practiced. Christians also preferred burials. Wall graves were dug and were usually laid out vertically as it could contain one or more bodies. Another way was to have burial rooms containing graves all for one family. It gives you a chill when you descend into the realm of those dead and still dwelling here. Capuchin Crypt behind Piazza Barberini is where you can see the bones of thousand Capuchin monks. You’ll find skeletal remains of 3,700 bodies believed to be Capuchin friars buried by their order. There are six total rooms in the crypt. These would be the spooky highlights of your tour. The interesting history of the Basilica of Saint Clement makes it a key point to visit. Travel Trip- The Catacombs of St. Callixtus are closed on Wednesdays.
Robert Coghlan

114 Followers, 5 Reviews


Monte Testaccio - Rome

Monte Testaccio. This is an ancient man made mountain of pottery which today is surrounded by clubs and bars. Only in Rome will you see this happen and I love it. By day you can go play on monte testaccio and climb up all of this old amphora from all over the ancient world: Spain, Africa, Greece and Egypt, and then later you can go back to the same area to go to bars and clubs and go to the Macro, one of Rome’s brand new Modern art museums. Now I realize that this is once again history but I think a mountain of pottery deserves its own spot.
Ashley & Alex

205 Followers, 19 Reviews


The Protestant Cemetery of Rome - Rome

The Protestant Cemetery is an out of the way spot in Rome located in the neighborhood of Testaccio. It is a really serene place to spend a few hours exploring. The cemetery holds the graves of several well known expats and it’s located just within the Aurelian Walls, which allows you to get up close to ancient Roman walls and the pyramid tomb of Gaius Cestius.
Ashley & Alex

205 Followers, 19 Reviews


San Francesco a Ripa - Rome

This 17th century church houses various delightful sculptures of 17th century Renaissance artists. Situated on the edge of river Tiber, it is dedicated to Francis of Assisi. This church is pretty old and has been renovated and reconstructed several time, the last time being somewhere in the 1680's. The church houses the very controversial and popular sculpture of Bernini- Beata Ludovica Albertoni (Blessed Ludovica Albertoni) Along with this there are various paintings by Gaulli, Salviati etc.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Circus Maximus - Rome

Circus Maximus is where the ancient sport lovers would go to seek some entertainment. It was the largest and the first stadium of Ancient Rome. Since Chariot Racing was the most popular sport back then, loved by all Romans, this stadium held chariot races and entertained the Roman Crowd. It could house almost 1/4th of the Roman population. The first king of Rome, Romulus, is said to have held Chariot races here. This huge stadium today signifies the glory of Roman kings as well as the lifestyle of its people. A very significant monument to understand the public life of Rome.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Basilica Santi Giovanni e Paolo - Rome

Next, marvel at the Basilica of Santi Giovanni e Paolo (Saints John and Paul), with its monastery and bell tower built upon the imposing ruins of a temple dedicated to the emperor Claudius. After a lovely walk past the gardens, still cultivated today by the nuns, explore some of medieval Rome and the Circo Massimo (Circus Maximus), where chariot races kept the Roman Empire entertained.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Santa Cecilia in Trastevere - Rome

This 5th century church is dedicated to Cecilia, the patron saint of Music. The church is lined with beautiful frescoes and late Renaissance architecture. One of the major highlights inside is the sculpture of St. Cecilia by the late-Renaissance sculptor Stefano Maderno. This sculpture seeeks to emulate the dead body of the saint. It also includes Pietro Cavallini's beautiful fresco in the nun's choir. You can also visit the excavations of the ancient Roman homes that are underway nearby.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Basilica di San Clemente - Rome

Discover another Rome beneath the known monuments, where a silent city is revealed underneath the grandiose Renaissance and Baroque architecture. We start at the beautiful Basilica of San Clemente to admire its unique mosaics and crucified Christ in a festival of trees and doves. Not far from the mosaics lies the Cappella di Santa Caterina. A small stairway will take you to the lower basilica, built in the 4th century AD. From here, another staircase leads to the 3rd underground level from the 1st century AD. Some of the rooms were part of an apartment block separated by a passable street from another large building that was perhaps a state mint.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Santa Maria In Trastevere - Rome

An excellent example of Romanesque architecture, the Santa Maria Church situated in Trastevere is one of the oldest churches in Rome. Designed by architect Carlo Fonatna, this church was originally founded in the 3rd century by Pope Callixtus. Some of the best 13th century mosaics are be found here including Pietro Cavallini's Life of the Virgin. It was the first church in which mass was celebrated openly. There is a tall column near the church which marks an ancient legend that the day Christ was born a river of oil flowed down to earth. The pillar is built on that supposed spot.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Palatino / Palatine Hill - Rome

Rome was built on seven hills and Palatino or the Palatine Hill happens to lie in the centre. Legend has it that the founder of Rome, Romulus and his twin brother Remus were saved by a wolf right here and it probably is the presence of such tales that make Palatino all the more interesting. With impressive ruins and the greenest of trees and bushes, Palatino leaves you with majestic views. It once used to be a posh Roman neighbourhood, home to emperors and wealthy families. Palatino is now majorly covered by ruins which once formed Emperor Domitian's Imperial Palace. The walk is long and beautiful and for those interested, there is also a museum (Museo Palatino) the admission to which is included in your ticket. Getting There: The Palatine Hill is a 2 minute walk from the Colosseo metro station which is on Line B of the Rome metro system and the tickets for the train which runs every few minutes come for 1.5 Euros. They can be bought from the several machines or the ticketing counters at the station. Make sure you have a map of the otherwise complicated underground transport system which runs from 5:30 am to 11:30 pm with you and watch out for the pickpockets. The tickets for Colosseum include the Roman Forum and Palatine Hill and will cost you 12 Euros. It is advisable to buy the tickets from the Palatine Hill entrance on Via Di San Gregorio (From the metro station, walk south past the Arch of Constantine and continue down the aforementioned street) because you will find no queues unlike the ticket counters at Colosseum and Roman Forum. See the Palatino first, followed by the Roman Forum and save Colosseum for the end. Visit before noon so that you are done with everything by evening.
Sumedha Bharpilania

1k+ Followers, 140 Reviews


Pons Cestius - Rome

This ancient stone bridge is set against an extremely romantic setting. It is the bridge that connects the western shore of the Tiber to the Tiber Island. This bridge was built in 1st century BC and was renovated a bit in the 19th century. It is an important link to the Tiber Island from the west bank of the river. The bridge not only highlights the architecture of ancient Rome but is also a great place to stand and watch the Tiber flow underneath!
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


The Colosseum - Rome

The Roman Colosseum or Coliseum, originally known as the Flavian Amphitheatre, was commisioned in AD 72 by Emperor Vespasian. It was completed by his son, Titus, in 80, with later improvements by Domitian. The Colosseum is located just east of the Roman Forum and was built to a practical design, with its 80 arched entrances allowing easy access to 55,000 spectators, who were seated according to rank. The Coliseum is huge, an ellipse 188m long and 156 wide. Originally 240 masts were attached to stone corbels on the 4th level.
Tiziana Gargaro

146 Followers, 8 Reviews


Isola Tiberina - Rome

Continue to Isola Tiberina (Tiber Island) to find the ancient Ponte Fabriano and the church of San Bartolomeo. In the heart of Trastevere, visit the Basilica of Santa Cecilia and the church of San Crisogono, where remains of a church built in the 4th century were discovered in the early 20th century.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


San Nicola in Carcere - Rome

Pass the unique church of San Nicola in Carcere. Even from a distance you will see six imposing columns of an ancient Roman temple, built into the side walls of the church. Descend to the underground level and be catapulted back to a magical time.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Bir Fud - Rome

Bir e fud is another fantastic beer bar in Trastevere and it is actually across the street from Ma Che Siete. Bir e Fud has both (as you may have noticed) beer and food. Bir e Fud has over 100 microbrews from all over Italy and they specialize in Neapolitan style pizza (and yes pizza is different all over Italy). This is a great place to start your evening of beer and then head across the street to Ma Che Siete.
Ashley & Alex

205 Followers, 19 Reviews


Ma che siete venuti a fà - Rome

Ma Che Siete Venuti a Fà is located in Trastevere on Via di Benedetta, 25. Ma Che Siete Venuti a Fà means “What the hell are you doing here” and is a tiny, fun bar that is really serious about their beers. They have beer selections from all over the world and currently they have 9 Italian beers on tap, 4 English beers, 1 Swiss beer, a Belgian beer and a German beer on tap. They are open from 11am-2am everyday so if you find yourself in Trastevere and you cannot handle anymore wine head here. You may even see our roommate Adrian here (our wonderful guest poster on Paris) but you may not recognize him anymore without all his hair.
Ashley & Alex

205 Followers, 19 Reviews


Campidoglio - Rome

The access to the Piazza is through a majestic flight of steps called Cordonata. The current structure is dated to 1560, as a result of the project by Michelangelo Buonarroti inspired by pre-existent buildings. In Piazza del Campiglio you can also find the famous statue of the She-wolf with the twins (Romulus and Remus).
Tiziana Gargaro

146 Followers, 8 Reviews


Altare della Patria - Rome

Also known as the Vittorio Emmanuel II Monument, we went to the top to get a great view over the city of Rome (cost 7 Euro p.p).
wtraveltogether.com

144 Followers, 18 Reviews


Campo De' Fiori - Rome

Literally translated into the "Field of Flowers" this place was once a meadow. In the Ancient Rome context it lay between the famous theater of Pompey and the Tiber river. It was mainly deserted due to the overflowing of the river. The region populated only a few centuries back though, and now a lively market exists there. There is a huge statue of Giordano Bruno, a philosopher who was burned at stake during the Roman Inquisition. This place has a historical significance and is at the same time a great opportunity to interact with the locals.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Trajan Forum - Rome

Built by Emperor Trajan, this was the largest Imperial hall and was once a center of political and government center of Rome. At that time this forum was an architectural wonder for the world unrivaled by almost no other structure. The entire complex consists of a Basilica, Two grand libraries a temple and a market place. The was one of the last forums built and was an important center of public life. Much of Rome's ancient style of living can be seen here along with some splendid examples of architectural and antithetical beauty.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Piazza Venezia - Rome

Piazza Venezia situated in the heart of Rome is a public square with much chaos and traffic. This square engulfs the everyday life of the Romans. Two important monuments are located here. Palazzo Venezia from which the place gets it's name is a palace dedicated to Saint Mark, the patron saint of Venice.( This place was a former embassy of Venice in Rome.) Another one is Vittoriano, dedicated to King Victor Emmanuel II, the first king of Italy.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Basilica Di Santa Prassede - Rome

Along with Castel Sant'Angelo, Basilica Di Santa Prassede has stood the testimony of time and a many economical and artistic changes that occurred from the 5th to the 14th century A.D., tracing Roman past from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. Having been reestablished under Papal authority, it served as a saving grace and hidden space for many Popes and Cardinals through various tribunal and war times.
Sergio Grom

179 Followers, 9 Reviews


St. Mary Major - Rome

The Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore or St Mary Major is the biggest and the most important church dedicated to the Virgin Mary in Rome. The building of this church was inspired by the idea that Rome (at that time) was the center of the Christian World. Today, the church enjoys a somewhat embassy-like status with the Vatican police guarding it. It has a typical Roman architecture and was built by Pope Liberio after he saw Mary in his dreams. Our Lady pointed him towards the locations for building the church with snowfall and thus the church is also called "Our Lady of the Snows."
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Basilica di Santa Maria Sopra Minerva - Rome

A lesser known gothic church in Rome, the Chiesa di Santa Maria Sopra Minerva is home to Michelangelo's 'Christ Bearing The Cross' and is guarded by Bernini's beautiful 'Elefantino' sculpture mounted on an obelisk outside. The greatly reworked 13th Century church closes at 7 in the evening and the entry is free. If you are a Harry Potter fan, make sure you get a picture of the outer facade of the 'Grand Hotel Minerva' on the Piazza della Minerva, opposite the basilica. It will continue to remind you of everybody's favourite professor/mentor/cat. Getting there: The Basilica on Piazza della Minerva is 200 metres from the Pantheon on Piazza della Rotonda. Taking the underground metro is the best idea because it is faster and cheaper if in case you are not living near the Centro Storico area. The tickets come for about 1.5 Euros and can be bought from the several machines or ticketing counters at the station. Your stop is 'Spagna' along the A Line and the Piazza is a bit of a walk, about 1.2 kilometres from the station. Beware of pickpockets on the train. You could even take a bus from the Termini Station.
Sumedha Bharpilania

1k+ Followers, 140 Reviews


Santa Maria Sopra Minerva - Rome

Crossing the Tiber we reach the Santa Maria Sopra Minerva. This Church is one of the main churches for the Roman Catholics and is the only Gothic church in Rome. It was built over the ruins of the temple of Minerva, the Greco-Roman Goddess of Wisdom and is thus called the Church of Saint Mary over Minerva. There are Renaissance sculptures inside the church, including Michelangelo's Christ Bearing the Cross. There are also various Renaissance and post-Renaissance tombs here.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Centro Storico - Rome

The last part of the day would be best suited to roam in Centro Storico. The so-called historical center is quite small and constitutes only around 4% of the city area. In the closing years of the Roman Republic, an open-aired theatre was built. Named after Emperor Augustus's nephew Marcus Marcellus, it is called the Theatre of Marcellus. This ancient edifice was one of the most important theatres in its times. You can ask your guide to give details about the formation of the Gate of Ottavia. One of the best-preserved of all Roman buildings is the Pantheon, which was built 1800 years ago. The name Pantheon refers to the building's original function as a temple for all the gods. The forty-three meter high dome is the remarkable feature of this structure. You can then walk to Piazza Navona to cover the Fountain of the Four Rivers by Bernini. Trevi fountain is the largest Baroque fountain in the city and one of the most famous fountains in the world. Baroque is the most artistic period of Rome, which was embellished with sculpture, painting, architecture, literature, dance, and music around 1600. Taking Carlo Maderno's lead, Da Cortona, Bernini and Borromini created outstanding, major works of art. Try to cover as many of these great architectural world as you can. Most of it includes churches as during the Baroque period the Roman Catholic Church took artistic control in almost every respect. Besides churches there are numerous palaces, piazzas, and fountains that you can see. Make sure you have a guide and have some material with you with information on the many artists and their display of art here.
Robert Coghlan

114 Followers, 5 Reviews


Saint Ignatius'Church - Rome

A Roman Catholic church dedicated to Ignatius of Loyola. It offers unique views of the city looking out from the staircase. Once you go inside your eyes will be fixated on the dome. If you look closely, you'll realize that it's not really a dome, but flat. Jesuit painter Del Pozzo painted a trompe l'oeil or optical illusion.
Maria Rosaria Moscato

160 Followers, 36 Reviews


Temple of Hadrian - Rome

Built by Antoninus Pius, successor of Hadrian after whom the temple is named, Temple Of Hadrian was much once decorated with trophies and reliefs of the conquests (the relics now lie in a near by museum). Today only the 11 pillars at the north end remain. These pillars were integrated in the 17th century to make a new customs office. Today, there resides the Roman Stock Exchange within it. A superimposition of the modern on the ancient- that is pretty much what Temple of Hadrian is.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Galleria Alberto Sordi - Rome

An elegant shopping mall on one side of Piazza Colonna, Galleria Alberto Sordi houses lots of small boutiques and shops. Perfect for just wandering around and looking at things on offer.
Maria Rosaria Moscato

160 Followers, 36 Reviews


Museo e Galleria Borghese - Rome

The Borghese Museum is one of Rome’s most breathtaking buildings. Filled with some of the most important art in the world, your guide will provide a lively and fascinating commentary as you explore the galleries. Built by Cardinal Scipione Borghese in the early 17th century to show off his extraordinary art collection, the Galleria Borghese is set in one of Rome’s loveliest and largest parks. The gallery also includes some great masterpieces by Bernini, Caravaggio, and Raphael along with many others. The gallery is home to the world’s best ancient Roman and Greek artifacts, including mosaics depicting gladiators in combat and a mysterious sleeping hermaphrodite.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Hotel Sistina - Rome

Talk about location and this one is pretty convenient while visiting Rome. Situated a stone’s throw from the top of the Spanish stairs, it provides a good place to start exploring the city of seven hills. Of course there is the Hassler Roma and Hotel de Russie as also the Inglaterra but if you know of these and can afford them without breaking a sweat (or a sizeable bank) you can skip to the next point. o Tips: Try and avoid anything and everything touristy which can be tough because the locals don’t really let you in on things to do. Even recommendations on sites that seem reliable can often land you in some crappy joint. Sometimes classic joints have lost their original charm (Dar Poeta for pizzas is good but not superb and Checco e Carretiere pasta is highly overrated for the price they command and the sloppy service they dish out) and sites may fail to show the updated version. Read around as much as you can. I will share some links I found useful.
Magandeep Singh

323 Followers, 26 Reviews


Viale Vaticano - Rome

The Vatican. The grandest churches and architecture from The Roman catholic church. we also visited some Greek orthodox churches in cyrpus and the contrast in the rituals and the architecture is noticeable.
Anirudh Gupta

413 Followers, 25 Reviews


Trinita' Dei Monti - Rome

We climb up the Spanish steps to meet this magnificent structure. This church is a later Renaissance structure and is dedicated to the Holy Trinity. This church was originally constructed to commemorate France's victory over Naples and was later re-constructed. It was built in the Gothic style, but the facade is neo-classical. It was raided of its richness during the Neapolitan Invasion.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Santa Maria in Montesanto - Rome

This is one of the twin churches in Piazza del Popolo along with Santa Maria Del Miracoli. Built in the 17th century, this church includes the handiwork of three great architects. Started by Carlo Rainaldi, continued by Gian Bernini and finally completed by Carlo Fontana. Literally meaning the Holy Mountain, this is also called as the Church of artists because of the weekly mass conducted here by artists. Referring to Mount Carmel in Israel it is dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The two structures are considered to be twin structures because they look similar, but if you look closely you will find this one to be much different than the Santa Maria of Miracoli.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Santa Maria del Popolo - Rome

To the north of Piazza Del Popolo, this church was one of the earliest and richest Renaissance structures. It was built in 1099 and houses works of various famous and iconic artists and sculptures like Raphael, Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Caravaggio, Alessandro Algardi. According to a legend, this area was haunted by Nero's ghost and the church was built to Exorcise his ghost. The interior of the church is adorned with many of Bernini's famous works along with other artists.
Eva Polino

247 Followers, 55 Reviews


Villa Borghese - Rome

Villa Borghese is not just an exceptionally beautiful park, it is also about 80 hectares of galleries and museums. Loved by joggers, families having a little picnic of their own and lovers alike, this park is all the more popular because it houses the best art gallery in Rome, the Museo e Galleria Borghese. This spectacular place is home to the works of Bernini, Raphael, Caravaggio and Botticelli among others and requires pre-booking in order to prevent itself from getting too crowded. Tickets inclusive of the booking fee come for about 11 Euros and the museum is open till 7pm from Tuesdays to Sundays. Entry to the park however, is free and you could go with some food of your own. Getting there: The best way to get to the Villa Borghese is by taking the underground metro because it is faster, cheaper and your station 'Flaminio' along the A line is about 500 metres. The tickets come for about 1.5 Euros and can be bought from the several machines or ticketing counters at the station. Beware of pickpockets.
Sumedha Bharpilania

1k+ Followers, 140 Reviews


Galleria Borghese - Rome

This awesome gallery is probably my favorite museum in all of Rome and yes its higher on the list than the Vatican. Why you may ask? Because its not crowded, really ever, because you must reserve tickets and a time slot. But really I think I would go there even if it was crowded. It has six Caravaggio paintings, one is even an apology by Caravaggio to the Pope (who happens to be a Borghese). It has the most beautiful Bernini pieces to be found in Rome and some amazing paintings with great stories behind them (like a Raphael that was taken in the middle of the night by the Pope’s nephew who set up the gallery). So much awesome in the art world is packed into just that one museum.
Ashley & Alex

205 Followers, 19 Reviews


Rome Cavalieri - Rome

Overlooking the terracotta-roofed city, La Pergola in the Rome Cavalieri Hilton is the top dining room in town. Chef Heinz Beck’s decadent offerings (pepper marinated veal filet with Aubergine puree, or deep-fried zucchini flower on shellfish and saffron consommé with caviar, to name a few) have earned his restaurant three Michelin stars.
Ashmi

372 Followers, 56 Reviews


Villa Adriana - Rome

The countryside around Rome offers such a variety of landscapes that it is worth a holiday in itself.
Tiziana Gargaro

146 Followers, 8 Reviews


Santa Marinella - Rome

Santa Marinella is a beach town just outside of Rome, it is about thirty minutes away by train. It is a straight shot out of Rome; you just take the Roma-Pisa line heading toward Cittavechia, the main port. Santa Marinella is a large beautiful beach and well worth the trip. There is a slightly closer beach to Rome, Ostia, but it’s always crowded and the water isn’t too clean. You’re better off going to the ruins there instead. Plus the train ride is along the coast so plus there! Santa Marinella is a great day trip to escape the crowds and the heat of Rome.
Ashley & Alex

205 Followers, 19 Reviews


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