Top 8 Places to visit in Selcuk

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Best things to do in Selcuk and sightseeing in Selcuk

Ephesus - Selcuk

Day 5 – Ephesus I am a history lover and this was probably one of the days I was looking forward to the most. Ephesus, or Efes, was the ancient Greek city and is said to be built in the 10th century BC. It later fell into Roman influence and came under Roman Empire. The city was completely destroyed and abandoned in 14th century AD and all that lies there now is the ruins. We took a public train from Izmir to Selcuk and reached in about one and a half hours. From there we boarded a minibus to Ephesus and reached our destination in around 15-20 minutes. The entry ticket to the ancient city cost us around 1500 INR. Honestly, Somya and I were a little surprised by the high cost of ticket. But, all of the money was worth it. As we stepped inside, in front of us lay a beautiful town destroyed with time. With every step I took, I could feel history coming to life. On the marble roads I could feel the sound of Tongas and bullock carts that must have been filling the city with life during ancient times. I could imagine people dressed in Roman and Greek attires walking around. To me, each broken and intact stone in that place had come to life. I felt shivers running down my spine. I had never felt history so closely. Not even while visiting the Indian Mughal monuments. Here, history was much older and gripped me with much more intensity. First in line was a stadium and theatre (teatro). While walking towards the stadium I observed a huge sewer line and big marble stones broken and randomly placed with inscriptions on them. The stadium was fascinating but not as fascinating as the ancient library. It was huge and I could feel scholars walking there, looking for books and silently sitting and reading. I saw a supposed brothel of the time, which was locked. I managed to steal a glimpse of the rooms inside. We walked for several miles and saw many fascinating structures. Most intriguing was a church of mother Mary. It still had a cross in black made on one of the walls. The church was constructed at a little distance from the main town so there weren’t many tourists at that point so Somya and I had some peaceful moments there. The other side of the church opened to a room which led to a gallery. The gallery was open and faced beautiful green mountains. Strong cold wind blew on my face as I stood on elevated ground looking at the mountains and I stood grasping the moment for a long time before Somya got bored and asked me if we could go. Reluctantly, I left with her and we exited the beautiful city. I took a last look at the city before finally moving on to have a cone of local ice cream. The ice cream was tasteless! We bought some souvenirs from the shops in the vicinity and then boarded a minibus back to Selcuk. On way to the tren estacion (train station), there was a beautiful lane decorated with trees and flowers, which had nice cafes. Old men sat at the cafes and bars playing board games. We chose a café, which had “free wi-fi” written on it. Somya recommended that we eat Ravioli, a famous Turkish Pasta prepared with Yogurt. Now, we did not know that the Pasta had yogurt in it and Somya is allergic to Yogurt. Me being me and being hungry, ordered a separate Ravioli and asked her to order her own. Somya was heartbroken after seeing her Ravioli and decided to stay hungry in order to not spend any more money. I, on the other hand, had to finish two Raviolis and ended up feeling sick. Nevertheless, the Ravioli was tasty but it was not something I could eat a large portion of. Finally, we boarded a train back to Izmir and while on our way back from the metro station to our house, we lost our way. And it started raining and had gotten quite cold. But, we were still feeling happy as we had thoroughly enjoyed our last day in Izmir. We did not even want to leave our pretty little abode.
Trisha Mahajan

348 Followers, 26 Reviews


Paula and Gordon

140 Followers, 19 Reviews


A trip to Ephesus, to the Ancient City of Anatolia Efes, a city famed for the Temple of Artemis, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. We get to see the huge city of Ephesus, sit in the great Temple of Artemis, the huge stadium that could hold over 25,000 people. It was initially used for dramas, but during the Roman era, it was used for gladiator combat. There was so many problems and troubles, that the government used the fights to keep the people occupied and not thinking about all the worries. The city of Ephesus was huge and it was a hot day at 36 degrees, we were ready for a break and a delicious, Turkish dish for lunch before heading to a fashion show for a store that creates the most famous and best leather jackets in Turkey, and maker for some of the most well known brands in the world, like Gucci and Vuitton. Of course those jackets and purses didn't have the name brand it yet. But we had the chance to buy any product at cost price, which ranged 200 to 1000 dollars. The staff were friendly, and the products were all amazing!
Lindsay Sartoris

126 Followers, 9 Reviews


Temple of Artemis - Selcuk

Paula and Gordon

140 Followers, 19 Reviews


The Temple of Artemis, one of the 7 wonders of the ancient world, was in Ephesus. • The statue of Artemis and her temple at Ephesus were built around 550 B.C. The temple of Artemis was deliberately burned down by Herostratos in an attempt to gain fame in 356 B.C. supposedly when Alexander the Great was born.
Ugur Yavuzturk

146 Followers, 23 Reviews


Virgin Mary House - Selcuk

The House is located on top of BulBul Mt. three miles south of Ephesus. It is believed that Mary together with St. John the Evangelist came to Ephesus and built a house for Mary on top a mountain isolated from the city to hide from Roman soldiers after the persecution of Jesus. The House was restored in 1951 and opened for prayers and pilgrimage.
Ugur Yavuzturk

146 Followers, 23 Reviews


Library of Celsus - Selcuk

The most recognizable structure in Ephesus is the Library of Celsus which dates to 125 AD and acts as the main tourist draw, enticing an average of 1.5 million visitors to the site each year. “Commanding” is the best way to describe the impressive facade of the Library, which has been carefully reconstructed from the original pieces. However even more impressive is the fact that the facade stands in its original location, exposed to the elements, yet with so much fine detail and decoration still present. We’ve only seen two other Turkish-Roman ruins of this magnitude – the Pergamon Altar and the MARKET Gate of Miletus – and they both reside in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin (and have been preserved there for over a hundred years).
Calli & Travis

229 Followers, 10 Reviews


(Terrace Houses) Ephesus - Selcuk

The terrace houses contain great engraving, mosaics, sections, floors, representing the lifestyle of the rich Ephesians who used to live in these apartments. You will visit the inner sections of these houses in which excavations still continue. The most ancient of the houses were built in the first century BC, and most of the houses were restored in the second century AD. The houses seem plain from outside, but inside were constructed with the highest standards of their era. They are decorated with mosaics and frescoes, and have interior courtyards in the center, with the ceiling open.
Ugur Yavuzturk

146 Followers, 23 Reviews


Ephesus - Selcuk

Ephesus is located in Selcuk, Izmir, Turkey. It was one of the most important cities on the Aegean coast of Asia Minor in the ancient world. The history of the city goes back to 3000 BC. The city was ruled by kings until the latter half of the second century BC, when the Romans took over Asia Minor from Pergamene Kingdom. It was a harbor city and the capital of Roman Asia during the Roman period. The city was also the most important commercial and financial center in the Asian dominions of Rome. Paul made numerous conversions among both the Jews and Greeks during his two visits to Ephesus on his second and third missionary journeys. The total area of the city is nine square kilometers. The fame and prosperity of Ephesus started declining in the second half of the fourth century A.D. Severe earthquakes, which happened between 369-370 AD, devastated the whole city. The city began losing its importance after the fifth century AD because that tens of thousands of people had died in the earthquakes and the harbor was damaged and silted up by the river Kystros.
Ugur Yavuzturk

146 Followers, 23 Reviews


Efes - Selcuk

The same day we started for Efes/ Ephseue. This is a must go place if you are travelling to Turkey. It has beautiful roman historical monuments like theatre, library. There is also Marymedene which is a big statue of Mother Mary. Efes has upper gate and lower gate. You can take taxi which will take you to Marymedene and then leave you at the upper gate, from where you can walk down and come to lower gate. The Efes site is 2 Km long and Marymedene is 10km away from Efes.
Jyoti sharma

366 Followers, 58 Reviews


Ephesus Museum - Selcuk

Ephesus is considered one of the great outdoor museums of Turkey and is the best preserved classical city of the Eastern Mediterranean which enable one to genuinely soak in the atmosphere of Roman times. Do you know that the Seven Churches of Revelation (mentioned in the Bible) was in Ephesus? (Revelation 2:1-7).
Sharon Phang

266 Followers, 30 Reviews


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Trisha Mahajan Travel Blogger
Trisha Mahajan
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