Mostar Tourism & Travel Guide

Nero in Bosnia: Walking in Mostar

What do I say about a town that seems like it has just been taken out of a medieval era and place...

Neeraj Narayanan
46 Days
London (UK) to Jammu (India) Road Trip

When in Iran, do as the Iranians do :-)Driving thru IranHike to THE WAVEZoroastrian Fire Temple (...

HumDono
Bummin' About In The Balkans

Starting in Dubrovnik, with four days to go and one duffle bag, I scaled the city walls and wande...

Craig A. Taylor


Dubrovnik
Dubrovnik is a unique and bewitching coastal town that has become the crowning glory of Croatia in recent years. The city is not only a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but also the place where parts of super popular TV show Game Of Thrones are shot. The Shah Rukh Khan-starrer Fan was also shot in this city making it a popular tourist attraction for Indians now! However, it's not just a famous shooting location; Dubrovnik has much more to offer. It is a glittering jewel in the Adriatic Sea bordering Croatia and it holds the power to leave you asking for more. The city's white limestone streets, buildings from the Baroque era and the shimmering Adriatic Sea will leave you mesmerised.One can spend a week, a month or even a year here and not get tired of this city, but for those who are on a tight budget, dedicate at least three days to see this city.What to see: 1. Walk along the Old City, Dubrovnik's best feature. It is the perfect place for a casual stroll to enjoy excellent views over the Adriatic Sea and the Old City centre.2. Walk on Stradun Street, the most famous street within the Old City. It is lined with shopping stalls and cafes on both sides and a great place to grab a cup of coffee and just relax.3. Don't miss out on Walking The Walls, a great architectural site in the city, and also the place where Game Of Thrones is shot.4. Take a cable car ride to Srđ Hill for the most amazing aerial views of the city.5. Visit Fort Lovrijenac, dubbed as 'Croatia's Gibraltar', and Croatia's most prominent fortress.6. Visit the beautiful Dominican and Franciscan monasteries. 7. Spend a day visiting the Elaphite Islands surrounding Dubrovnik.8. Take a Game Of Thrones tour and visit all the spots where the show is shot.Some tips1. Prices around Old Town are really high, so try and negotiate and go in a large group rather than alone.2. Public transport in Dubrovnik is also cheap and efficient.3. You can reach the top of Srđ Hill by taxi as well, if the line to the cable car is too long.Costs Per DayLocal Transport (Bus & Metro): Rs. 500 (50 Croatian Kuna)Taxi Starting Tariff: Rs. 60/kmHotel Stay: Average price for a night per person is Rs. 4500 (450 Croatian Kuna)A Meal: A lunch or dinner without alcohol will cost you around Rs. 1500 (150 Croatian Kuna), and with alcohol around Rs. 3000 (300 Croatian Kuna).
Split
The remains of Diocletian’s Palace in Split is the heart of the city. A main getaway to the south Dalmatian islands, Split in itself is a city that you must stop and explore. Always buzzing, always alive, this city is a perfect example of a seamless blend of old and new; and this blend is clearly shown by bars, restaurants and shop hidden in between ancient columns, temples, walls.What to see: 1. Start your day by visiting Diocletian’s Palace, the ancient Roman ruin that was built in 305 AD.2. Cathedral of St. Domnius is recognised as the oldest cathedral in Croatia and one of the most well-preserved Roman buildings in Split. Visit this cathedral and then climb the bell tower for the most beautiful panoramic view of the city.3. Visit the Riva Waterfront and promenade for some relaxing time and to pick up souvenirs. This is the place to try delicious ice creams and enjoy a hot cup of coffee while staring at jewelled waters.4. Climb up the Marjan Hill for some amazing views of surrounding islands on one side and imposing mountains on the other.5. After that tiring climb up and down the hill, relax at Bačvice Beach and spend the evening enjoying the sunset.6. For a fun night out, check out Ghetto Bar, famous for its delicious cocktails or just chill at the Bačvice Beach shacks with a pint of beer or two.Some tips1. Almost every bar and coffee house has free wifi. The passwords are generally written on the receipts, but if you don't get one, ask the waiter and he/she will happily provide you with one.2. Public transport is almost non-existent, but the cabs here are cheaper compared to the rest of the country, Uber being the cheapest option.Costs Per DayLocal Transport (Buses): Rs. 1000 (90 Croatian Kuna)Taxi Starting Tariff: Rs. 60/kmHotel Stay: Average price for a night per person is Rs. 4000 (400 Croatian Kuna)A Meal: A lunch or dinner without alcohol will cost you around Rs. 1400 (140 Croatian Kuna), and with alcohol around Rs. 3000 (300 Croatian Kuna).
Bari
We had Eurail passes for 3 months which also included almost free Ferry services(10 euros) from Bari (Italy) to Patras (Greece). Had overnight journey from Milan to Bari. After 45 days, we were quite used to such long journeys. We also gained expertise in several odd things like eating McD burgers at the slowest pace to pass around our nights at stations in cold European weather.Reached Bari around 8 am and first usual thing we did - Find a McD or McCafe (Savior or 4th friend). Necessities done (Nice feeling) and Cornetti plus Cappuccino (Heavenly feeling)
Zadar
I took a very long, but great route getting here. First I passed through Plitvice Lakes National Park. Next, I rode over Mali Alan pass. Earlier, in the morning, it was raining a tiny bit, so I was happy to see that it stopped by the time I started up the pass. I’d just have to deal with a little fog at the top. The road surface wasn’t too bad…some occasional loose gravel and ruts, but nothing serious, and there hadn’t been enough rain to make it muddy. Coming down the south side was a little more nerve wracking. Less than fifty feet of visibility and hairpins with no warnings or guardrails made for some very slow riding.After getting down from the pass, I was about 30km from my destination, but decided to backtrack to get some riding in along the coast…wise choice. The view was amazing, the road surface was surprisingly good, and the riding was excellent. I rode from Senj to Zadar…any motorcyclists out there that want a nice route, keep this one in mind. So, now I’m in Zadar…it’s a nice little city with some Roman ruins to see in the old town…very interesting. Right on the water were two cool features. The first was the sea organs, which are large tubes underneath marble steps leading to the waterfront. As waves pass over the tubes underneath these steps, they emit different sounds. And the second shows up after sunset…the Greeting to the Sun. This large disk has LEDs of various colors that light up in crazy patterns, and all the while, you can hear the sea organs in the background…just add mushrooms and you’ve got yourself a party!

About Mostar

Crossing into Bosnia and Herzegovina the next day brought on a drastic change. Mosques started showing up in villages instead of just churches, cars from the 90s were traded for cars from the 70s, houses were far more utilitarian…but there were still plenty of stray dogs. I arrived in Mostar (unofficial capital of Herzegovina) and had plenty of the day left to see a bit of the city. In 1992, the Serbian Orthodox church (in eastern Mostar) was destroyed. Today, they are just now starting to rebuild the church.The ruins of the original church are still at the site. They were able to retrieve the church bells from the rubble, which will be used again in the new church.

Best Time To Visit Mostar

Best time to visit Mostar is from March to April and from August to September
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