Colonial blues of the Nilgiri

Tripoto
7th May 2014

Mukurthi national park

Photo of Colonial blues of the Nilgiri by Harleen Kalsi

Parson Valley Lake

Photo of Colonial blues of the Nilgiri by Harleen Kalsi

Porthimund waters

Photo of Colonial blues of the Nilgiri by Harleen Kalsi

Pykara Falls

Photo of Colonial blues of the Nilgiri by Harleen Kalsi

En route Mukurthi national park

Photo of Colonial blues of the Nilgiri by Harleen Kalsi

‘’Its quintessentially pastoral depiction reminded me of some of Austen’s Victorian settings painted so ambitiously in her stories.’’

If we are to prattle on about hill stations in India to me the most obvious ones would be those trails lined up in the Northern belt and the Himalayas but being from the North that’s just not equal to what is termed as ‘’exploring’’.  Therefore, I decided to chart out a map all over the damaged walls. We have read so much about the Western Ghats but never even considered going down that road.  
My elder sister’s newfound love for photography that made her switch careers, forced us to look for a place that is so photogenic that a lucrative job offer with National Geographic would be waiting for her at her doorstep with an amazing portfolio. She suggested Ooty and so we made a big blob on the map. Hence, giving birth and freedom to an adventure called the ‘’blues of Nilgiri trails’’. 

That big blob is nestled in the Nilgiris. Ooty has an irresistible charm of its own and the power to create a vibrant assault on all your senses. From Bangalore, we drove for 6 hours to Ooty. Originally known as Udhagamandalam or Ootacamund, was once a summer capital of the British. Amalgamation of distinctive flowers, routes folded under nature’s fruits, animals that are so rare that i don't even remember their names and the best people watching.
Photo of Ooty, Tamil Nadu, India by Harleen Kalsi
Ooty raises a cry that screams ‘wild child’, this breed is bound to wander through the wilderness and along with bellowing meadows of Pastor Valley, base for our trek to Mukurthi national park. The reserve is a splendid plethora of flora and fauna. Although, as much as we appreciated the beauty of it we were more excited to get a shot or two of the famous Nilgiri Tahr or any other endangered species. We navigated around intense wilderness of the forest to the vast stretches of the greenlands blended so perfectly with the groves of trees and sholas that nothing seemed more at rest enough to put me into trance. The tropical weather sure did give us a run for our jackets and a cup of tea.
Photo of Mukurthi National Park, Pykara, Sholur, Tamil Nadu, India by Harleen Kalsi
This trail, as planned led us to our next destination that was the quaint Porthimund Lake. A placid reservoir and its mystical backdrop obscured further view highlighting the mystery of its flow. Its quintessentially pastoral depiction reminded me of some of Austen’s Victorian settings painted so ambitiously in her stories.
Photo of Porthimund Lake, Nilgiris, Tamil Nadu, India by Harleen Kalsi
Near the Mukurthi national park as it flows from its peak until the perimeter of the plateau, the Pykara falls are otherworldly. Crystal in nature and they portray scintillating vibes. The climax produced a transcending effect as we played ‘’the end’’ by The Doors on our way back.
Photo of Pykara, Sholur, Tamil Nadu, India by Harleen Kalsi
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