Miniature Paintings And Their Struggling Artists

Tripoto
Photo of Miniature Paintings And Their Struggling Artists by Vineet Joshi

3 City Miniature Painting: Udaipur , Jaipur and Jaisalmer

Photo of Udaipur, Rajasthan, India by Vineet Joshi

The Miniature Paintings of Udaipur symbolizes Rajasthan perfectly - colourful, detailed and opulent.

Udaipur is famous for its miniature paintings and art classes. These paintings are one of the most prominent items you will find showcased in the city.

The history of these paintings dates back long ago. The 16th century painters would paint detailed patterns onto a tiny canvas, and present them to Kings, to keep as memoirs of certain specific events.

Although these paintings are only used for beautification today but there inspiration still remains the same.

Thus, most of the artwork today is inspired from the earlier centuries and are usually quite similar.

Miniature Paintings drawn on British Postcards.

Photo of Miniature Paintings And Their Struggling Artists by Vineet Joshi

Miniature Paintings are a perfect example of skill mastery, precision and patience.

The canvas used for Miniature Paintings is mostly paper or silk, but earlier, ivory was preferred as a royal gift. Moreover special pigments and brushes are required along with a good canvas for utmost precision and accuracy.

Artistic details visible through a magnifying glass.

Photo of Miniature Paintings And Their Struggling Artists by Vineet Joshi

Not just a thing of beauty, but an archive of the past.

During my recent visit to Udaipur, I got in a conversation with a local artisan and he shared with me a bit of his life and dreams.

Mr. Lokesh Kumawat outside his Art School.

Photo of Miniature Paintings And Their Struggling Artists by Vineet Joshi

Mr. Lokesh Kumawat owns a very small and humble shop next to Zostel, Udaipur, where he teaches and sells his art. His shop in named after his daughter Sakshi.

Lokesh Ji is a local from Udaipur, but his forefathers were from Amet. They used to visit Udaipur to help in building works (such as in City Place).

After his father got a serious drinking habit, the pressure to support his family came on Lokesh Ji's young shoulders.

Seeing this, his uncle taught him the art of miniature painting, so he can sustain himself and his family.

It has been 20 years since then and Lokesh Ji himself is a master of the art now.

Father & Daughter

Photo of Miniature Paintings And Their Struggling Artists by Vineet Joshi

'I don't want her to learn all of this. During peak season I earn about ₹1000 - ₹1500. But during off season it is difficult to even manage daily bread. We can't just keep on producing when there is no sale. Both my daughter and son ( Naksh ) will become guides. I will make them learn different languages and skills.' shared Lokesh Ji.

Apart from selling the paintings himself, he also sells them to large showrooms. They give him around ₹300 per painting and sells it for ₹1,000 - ₹1,500 themselves.

Most paintings are painted using a magnifying glass.

Photo of Miniature Paintings And Their Struggling Artists by Vineet Joshi

'The work is quite detailed and need lots of hard work. People don't appreciate this fact. The painting of the 3 cities ( showcases above ) took me 5 days. The horse in it represents power, the elephant, good luck and the camel, love. It is my personal favorite. I hope people from our country appreciate the work as well. Otherwise we will have to sleep hungry. '

Photo of Miniature Paintings And Their Struggling Artists by Vineet Joshi

And with this, our little conversation ended. He was not wrong. Udaipur is filled with artists ( not just painters ) who are trying to make their ends meet, but we often get attracted to the shiny lights of the big showrooms.

So next time we are traveling, let's try supporting the local artists.

They need us.

Khamma Ghani !

PS: For more such stories, visit me here.

Be the first one to comment