Gairal Forest Rest House 1/1 by Tripoto
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This Rest house could be a favorite with plenty of frequent guests to the park, even if it's placed right on the eastern border and also the reserve forest, as it is in the simplest locations. Gairal is found simply higher than the bank of the Ramganga with high hills in each direction. It consists of 3 all totally different types of accommodations. These square measure 1) the recent building, 2) the new building and 3) the jungle huts. The recent building features a terribly nice charm with it’s sloping roof, shaded porch and proximity to the neighboring forest and tower. The rooms square measure well taken care of and also the square rooms astonishingly well created. The new forest building isn't terribly appealing in terms of appearance, with it’s single story box like form. It will have one positive facet, that is that the feeding hall. Some wonderful Indian dishes square measure on the market here.
Somesh Goyal
While we were settled for lunch at Kallaji’s dhaba in Dhikala after leaving Khinnanauli, my friend proposed a visit to Gairal, a less frequented and difficult to access forest of great beauty. This was to be the highest point of the trip! On the way we stopped at Jhirna Jali, another view point for crocodiles and gharials. Leaving the gharials to their siesta on the sandy banks of the Ram Ganga we resumed our journey to Gairal until I spotted a sambhar deer standing on a rock in an awkward posture. I had my camera ready to shoot, when it suddenly let out a call followed by another and yet another as if to warn the whole jungle of some hidden danger. Its tail was up and right foot stomping the rock. Petrified it stood glued to the rock looking across the river. Certainly our presence could not be the reason for its anxiety. The call was echoed by langurs, a confirmation of the movement of a skilful predator. From the SUV our eyes darted in all directions and froze at the sight of the black stripes on orange-yellow coat emerging from the tall elephant grass on the other bank of the river. The fully grown male tiger looked around and stepped into the river. The adrenalin was pumping hard. One eye at the tiger and the other on the view finder, I kept shooting the maharaja. Oh what a deft swimmer this cat can be! The sambhar fled and hid under cover of foliage. The langurs chattered themselves hoarse. We sat rooted in the SUV following every step of the tiger. Out of water, a big shrug and the tiger was just below us almost in eye to eye contact. Suddenly we found ourselves in the path of the big cat. Without firing the engine we rolled back about 20 meters to maintain safe distance respecting the right of way of the king of Corbett. The seasoned campaigner sensed some extraneous presence, delayed his appearance on the road. Once sure of his safety, the tiger finally appeared on the road quite relaxed but alert. He looked towards us, as if on purpose, eye to eye once