Kumartuli 1/20 by Tripoto
N/A
N/A
Photography
Free
All year
Solo, Friends
17 out of 60 attractions in Kolkata
As you walk a little from Shovabazar Ghat of River Hooghly or from the west gate of the Shovabazar metro Station towards the Rabindra Sarani Lane, you will come across the Kumartuli. This is a place where a number of Kumars or potters are always busy with their work of designing and sculpting huge statues of Gods and Goddesses which are later used for the festivals of the city. The most common are the statues of Goddess Durga here. Initially clay and straw are used to form the figures and then they are spray painted. The original material used are the marrows of the banana trees but now many other materials are being used in making these idols. Later, the idols are dressed in fine attires and are ready to be sent to the pandals for being worshipped.
Juin Biswas
I am a 23 year old Mechanical engineer and currently working in TCS Kolkata. I have spent a year in Kolkata and I had planned this trip last year around October (after Mahalaya) before Durga Puja because that is the best time when all the Durga idols getting its final touches. I had heard a lot about this place and it was on my list for a long time.I would recommend this place to those who have interest in photgraphy because this place has a lot to offer you. Kumartuli is located near Shobhabazar.The word Kumartuli comes from Kumar means potter and tuli means locality. It is traditional potters quarter where around 150 families are solely engaged in idol making and they have been in this occupation from past 300 years. It is a famous sculpting hot-spot which maufactures clay idols for various festivities. I have shared a few pictures of Kumartuli from my archives.Walking down the narrow lanes of Kumartuli is an offbeat experience altogether where you can actually see the amount of effort that goes into making such beautiful idols and enjoy watching the whole process of idol making with finest detailings.
rysha hamza
My partner was keen on experimenting with the Indian Chinese cuisine in Kolkata. Online sources confirmed that Terreti Bazar was Kolkata's very own Chinatown with the streets going live in the early hours of the morning. We are sure we reached the right place but we could not find the juicy momos and soupy noodles we were looking for. Instead we got to see life in action - fish and flowers laid out by the roadside and locals bathing and shaving and cooking all next to each other on the narrow pavements. We walked through the inside lanes to catch a glimpse of the despicable poverty and filthy living conditions Kolkata is often linked with. I feel the colour of the city is brown - brown with age, brown with dust, brown with dirt and in its varying shades, the color captures the earthy tones of existence in its crumbling brick walls and congested alleyways inhabited by a forgotten strata of society. The next on our agenda was Kumortuli - the globally acclaimed potters' quarter that manufactures and exports clay idols to different parts of the world. The artisans were at work as usual, adding a stroke here and a knot there. The straw and bamboo framework was plastered with paper mache and cow dung before the clay was applied. There were enormous statues of various Gods and Goddesses from the Hindu mythology fashioned out of clay dug out from the river side. We stopped to speak to an elderly man engrossed in his craft and watched him give life to clay right before our eyes. For lunch, we chose Nizam's inside New Market - the legendary restaurant that claims to have invented the ubiquitous Kathi roll. I must say the place lives up to its name. We attended the marriage that evening - a traditional Bengali wedding with all the hooting and snickering and chuckling that made it a happy affair. I watched intently as the couple underwent the various rituals with the holy fire bearing testimony to their lifelong union. The highlight was of course the sumptuous feast with an array of fish and mutton delicacies and the quintessential rasogolla.
nivedita1220
My second day in Kolkata had a lazy start with a relaxing hot water bath and delicious 'Luchi and Aloo Sabzi' and 'Jaggery Sandesh and Rosogulla'. I desperately wanted to go to Kumortuli and hence it was my first destination for the day. Metro connected Bhawanipore with Kumortuli pretty well. I had seen so many pictures of the streets of Kumortuli overflowing with artistic sculptures of Hindu Gods & Goddesses and Venerable men & women that I was jumping with excitement when I got the first glimpse of the street from a distance! After I entered the street, it felt like a different world altogether! Artists were painting and shaping the sculptures as if they were lost in meditation. I was humbled to see the dedication and affection with which each sculpture was being made. Since Saraswati Pooja was around the corner, a huge part of the Tuli was dedicated for sculptures of Goddess Saraswati. It would be an understatement to say that it is one of the best places in Kolkata for people who have an eye for art! As one wanders through the narrow streets of Tuli, the ages old British Era buildings add an entirely unique vibe to the experience. Some buildings even have a caution board on the front doors warning the passers-by of high chances of the collapse of those buildings! And, of course, on our way, we saw ' Putul Bari'! Tuli's end lead us to Ahiritola Ghat at dusk. After resting at the tranquil ghat of Hooghly, we took a local train to go to Prinsep Ghat. We reached Prinsep Ghat at sunset and the view was spectacular! Swami Vivekananda Bridge looked astonishingly beautiful with the multi-coloured lights reflected on the sparkling currents of Hooghly. We called it a day after a sumptuous North Indian dinner at ' Balwant Singh ka Dhaba ' on Harish Chandra Road.
nivedita1220
My second day in Kolkata had a lazy start with a relaxing hot water bath and delicious ‘Luchi and Aloo Sabzi’ and ‘Jaggery Sandesh and Rosogulla’. I desperately wanted to go to Kumortuli and hence it was my first destination for the day. Metro connected Bhawanipore with Kumortuli pretty well. I had seen so many pictures of the streets of Kumortuli overflowing with artistic sculptures of Hindu Gods & Goddesses and Venerable men & women that I was jumping with excitement when I got the first glimpse of the street from a distance! After I entered the street, it felt like a different world altogether! Artists were painting and shaping the sculptures as if they were lost in meditation. I was humbled to see the dedication and affection with which each sculpture was being made. Since Saraswati Pooja was around the corner, a huge part of the Tuli was dedicated for sculptures of Goddess Saraswati. It would be an understatement to say that it is one of the best places in Kolkata for people who have an eye for art! As one wanders through the narrow streets of Tuli, the ages old British Era buildings add an entirely unique vibe to the experience. Some buildings even have a caution board on the front doors warning the passers-by of high chances of the collapse of those buildings! And, of course, on our way, we saw ‘Putul Bari‘! Tuli’s end lead us to Ahiritola Ghat at dusk. After resting at the tranquil ghat of Hooghly, we took a local train to go to Prinsep Ghat. We reached Prinsep Ghat at sunset and the view was spectacular! Swami Vivekananda Bridge looked astonishingly beautiful with the multi-coloured lights reflected on the sparkling currents of Hooghly. We called it a day after a sumptuous North Indian dinner at ‘Balwant Singh ka Dhaba’ on Harish Chandra Road.
Prateek Dham
Rashmi Gopal Rao
Swapnil Soni
Amazing place, when you see people handcrafting and sculpting statues, priceless. Roaming around and clicking those photos, such experience you can't get everywhere.. Since I heard this place is famous for amazing sculptures and sculptors, it's been a pleasure being witness to that.
Raisa
This locality stuffed in the northern fringes of Kolkata houses generations of potters. Their heritage is as diversified as the gharanas (styles) of idols they create.
Sreyashi Mazumdar
Being trapped in the morbidity of a typical city life, Kumartuli ends up serving you a platter of shriveled memories. The broken alleys and the withered walls exude a sense of belongingness which seems untouched when one is amid the city-hullabaloo. Further, the place exemplifies the artistic roots of this city. Being a hub of artistry, a photographer interested in culture and people might bump into a series of instances to revel in. Therefore, I would suggest everybody to pay a visit to this place in a bid to trail down the forlorn essence of a typical Bengali culture.
Sagnik Basu
Kumartuli is the neighbourhood of artisans specializing in making clay idols of Gods and Goddesses. In makeshift shafts idols in various stage completion can be seen - from bamboo straw structures to the finished idols. The area becomes a fascinating hive of activity especially before the Durga Puja. Watching the artisans engrossed in the intricate work itself has the ability to mesmerize any onlooker. Today, the idols made in Kumartuli adorns pandals across the world . The temple at Kumartuli is also the abode of the original idol of 'Devi Dhakeshwari' brought from Dhaka during partition.
sreowshi sinha
The renowned clay artists supplies idols not only in Kolkata but also exports to different parts of the world.
Titas Bose
The best time to visit this place is right before the Durga Pujo, the largest event in the city in October. Because this is the place all the idols are made and it looks beautiful. But anytime in the year too, one may get to meet the talented and skilled workers. there are idols being made all the year round.