Bogyoke Aung San Market 1/6 by Tripoto
Tanya.Korteling
Next up was Bogyoke Aung San Market in Central Yangon. It was a sprawling under-cover market selling just about everything you can imagine. The main focus though appeared to be traditional arts and handicrafts. If you're in a shopping mood or are after some souvenirs then you could lose yourself here for several hours. Unfortunately I wasn't feeling it that day. Much as I love markets I just wasn't in a shopping haggling mood so we only had a quick look. I'd like to come back another time to spend more time browsing. The sky looked as if it was threatening rain so we bought an umbrella each. We'd been thinking about getting some for a couple of weeks but kept deciding against it. Everyone seemed to have them here though so we gave in, by the end of the day we were pleased we had. We pottered around the street's a bit longer looking at roadside vendors and stalls selling all-sorts. Tables overflowed with phone accessories, chargers and adapters, colourful fruit and vegetables, fish, dried fish and prawns. There were also several tea stations dotted about with with locals sitting sipping steaming glasses of green tea.
Tanya.Korteling
Next up was Bogyoke Aung San Market in Central Yangon. It was a sprawling under-cover market selling just about everything you can imagine. The main focus though appeared to be traditional arts and handicrafts. If you're in a shopping mood or are after some souvenirs then you could lose yourself here for several hours. Unfortunately I wasn't feeling it that day. Much as I love markets I just wasn't in a shopping haggling mood so we only had a quick look. I'd like to come back another time to spend more time browsing. The sky looked as if it was threatening rain so we bought an umbrella each. We'd been thinking about getting some for a couple of weeks but kept deciding against it. Everyone seemed to have them here though so we gave in, by the end of the day we were pleased we had. We pottered around the street's a bit longer looking at roadside vendors and stalls selling all-sorts. Tables overflowed with phone accessories, chargers and adapters, colourful fruit and vegetables, fish, dried fish and prawns. There were also several tea stations dotted about with with locals sitting sipping steaming glasses of green tea.
Molly
This market is the main shopping destination for tourists, though not exclusively so - there were still plenty of locals. Prices tend to be higher in the businesses that line the perimeter of the market, and these shops also appear to cater more to tourists and sell knick knacks and souvenirs. You have to wander in to get to the good stuff! However, as noted in my last post, most shopkeepers were very friendly and don't aggressively hawk their wares. A big indoor section of the market sold gold and jewelry. I don't have any skills in distinguishing good quality gems and metals from fakes, so I mostly just walked through this area without really looking closely. We came to an inner area with tightly-spaced shops that sold lots of fabrics. Many of the shops have tailors that they know who will create a longyi (the long skirt) for you out of a fabric that you choose. The fabrics come in a dizzying array of colors, patterns, and material. I ended up buying a hand-sewn bright green longyi with flowers along the border for about $15 USD, plus a tailoring fee of $5. There are many cheaper options; you can buy fabric for less than $5, but in this case I was willing to spend more for the quality.