Alamparai Fort 1/16 by Tripoto
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3 out of 4 attractions in Mahabalipuram

Alamparai Fort

Gunjan Upreti
Once a glorious fortress, built during the Mughal era, the Alamparai Fort is in ruins today but still speaks of the valorous tales of the past.Distance from Chennai: 2 h 48 min (110.1 km) via East Coast Road9. Get your dose of adrenaline at Muttukadu
Oscar Lawrence
Interesting titbits Large portions of the fort were further damaged during the 2004, Indian Ocean Tsunami and still remain submerged under the sea. Scenes from Pithamagan, a 2003 Tamil film, starring popular Kollywood actors Surya and Vikram was shot here. Archaeologists have excavated coins, rare artifacts like the arms and ammunition used by the Nawabs and French in the fort premises. The Tamil Nadu Tourism Development Corporation (TTDC) has listed the fort as one of twenty lesser known tourist spots in the state. Highly recommended for enthusiastic bikers, historians, adventure-seekers, dreamers, bloggers and photographers.
Oscar Lawrence
Safety tips Due to its isolated location, it is recommended to head back before sundown, for a safe trip. Local people and some unscrupulous elements are reportedly misusing this place for drinking. Wear proper footwear as broken glass pieces everywhere may pierce your foot. This unfrequented place is certainly not advisable for solo female travellers, however it shouldn’t matter for a large group of females. Local fishermen may offer to take you for a boat ride. Ensure that life jackets are provided, besides, negotiate the fare beforehand. For safety reasons, avoid swimming in the backwaters.
Oscar Lawrence
But, to the nitpicking and unimaginative, this place is simply another abandoned seashore, cluttered with disintegrating rocks and boulders, covered by overgrown shrubs and dangling creepers, and interspersed with broken liquor bottles and cigarette stubs.
Oscar Lawrence
A short, rugged trek through the golden sands littered with undergrowth, leaves, and fallen branches reveals what is left of the fort: fragments of weather-beaten red brick and limestone, and a forlorn mausoleum. With a feeling of reverential respect, a speculative thought arises in many an inquisitive mind: “How could a huge fort have stood on the sand, without any strong basement?”
Oscar Lawrence
At first glance, one’s roving gaze might question the absence of a security guard at the entrance. “But, where is the entrance?,” wonders the first-time visitor. As unexpected, instead of an impressive archway, a huge cavernous hole in the ancient wall welcomes everyone and all.
Oscar Lawrence
The solitary, god-forsaken look of the surroundings reflects the rampant and unmitigated apathy of the authorities towards the place. But, as every cloud has a silver lining, in midst of sheer neglect, lies a beautiful world waiting to trapped behind the lens.
Oscar Lawrence
Constructed during the Mughal era between 1736 and 1740, this erstwhile fortified seaport has changed hands quite a few times. It was once the prized possession of the Nawabs of Arcot, which was eventually ceded to the French, and subsequently lost to the British, who demolished it in 1760. In its heyday, it was the primary trading port on the Coromandel Coast for the Arcot nawabs, which included a 100-metre long dockyard stretching into the sea to transport an astonishing range of merchandise like salt, *zari cloth, and *ghee.
Oscar Lawrence
If you’re bitten by the shutterbug and smitten by wanderlust, the ethereal beauty encompassing the crumbling, desolate remnants of the 18th century Alamparai fort overlooking the lagoon and the Bay of Bengal yonder, is a feast for the eyes. The ravages of time, weather, and war have created a mosaic of stunning colours; an art to appreciate; and a sight to behold.
adithyan sivaraman
Ruins of Magnificent Alamparai Fort built by the Nawabs of Carnatic in 1700's and destroyed by the British in 1760. The Fort was more damaged by the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami