Theog Tourism & Travel Guide

Trips and Itineraries for Theog

I am talking about 6 days and 7 nights of endless driving, skirting almost every state of Himachal Pradesh starting from Shimla, covering Fagu, Theog, Narkanda....

View more comments...

Woke up this morning with a dream breaking out, a beautiful dream, of just serenity, calm, the chirp of birds, the deep intensity of a forest, the sound of a flowing river and the rain on my tin roof....

View more comments...


Weekend Getaways from Theog  

Best time to visit - January,February,March,October,November,December
The capital city of India is a glorious concoction of the old and the new. Temples that are centuries old, archaic Muslim quarters, and modern residencies, all exist alongside each other. Home to over a crore people, Delhi’s tourism is a treasure trove of historic gems, gardens, museums and a thriving food culture. Travel to the metropolis for the vibrant bazaars of Chandni Chowk that give way to Lutyens’ New Delhi, that is the pulse of the city. Among the numerous places to visit in Delhi city, for an insight into the magnificent Mughal era, go to the 16th century Humayun’s Tomb, the towering sandstone mosque of Jama Masjid, and experience the sound and light show at Red Fort. Tourists can spend mornings at the extravagant Akshardham Temple and evenings at the Hazrat Nizam-ud-din Dargah (shrine) that boasts of sufi music and delicious kebabs. Another popular attraction of Delhi city is its pulsating markets that from baubles to handicrafts, sell everything you can possibly think of. Those who have travelled to Delhi for its particular brand of food, won’t be disappointed. From hole-in-the-wall eateries and local student cafes in North Delhi to lavish restaurants and bars in South Delhi, there is no dish or cuisine you won’t find here. A huge incentive for Delhi’s tourism is its variety of public transport, wherein the Delhi Metro is the cheapest and easiest way to get around the city.


About Theog

We wanted to cover as much distance as possible before the sun started blazing down on us. We stopped at Jhilmil (Karnal) for breakfast and then at the foothills near Kalka for lunch and headed towards Theog. On our way we decided to make a stop at Chail for the day. After having tea in our hotel we went for a walk and realized Ammy was limping. Wasn’t he supposed to if he would walk in his riding boots which were almost kissing his knees? Somehow he made it back to the hotel. We slept well and left for Manali the next morning. We had to reach Theog and then take a turn towards Jhalori pass. The roads were nice and we eased through the lush green landscapes. It was only at Jhalori Pass that we had to ride on a comparatively tough uphill road and the bikes weren’t going beyond the 2nd gear. It got even worse when we left Jhalori Pass as the downhill seemed even tougher and the roads were in very bad shape. All this while we had a few minor breakdowns in the bike like a broken clutch wire, a punctured Tyre and jammed breaks but we managed all that by ourselves. Soon we hit Aut, crossed the amazing tunnel and reached Manali while it had started getting dark. Manali was jampacked and we couldn’t find a place to stay. Better still, it started raining heavily. Drenched, we all headed in different hotels to speed up the process of finding a room, which we eventually did late in the night, an expensive option, but had no choice at that time. We spent the next day in Manali, got our bikes checked, shopped for little stuff while it kept raining heavily throughout the day. Rain in Manali meant that Rohtang was getting covered in snow and so were the roads that lead us there. That was the day when we were bombed with Ammy’s intellectual questions including my personal favourite where he asked Aman, referring to his raincoat – “Is it waterproof dude?”We left next morning and it felt like our trip had actually begun. The roads were slurry and our bikes started slipping and skidding every now and then. The conditions weren’t friendly for sure but we kept moving steadily till the time we hit a traffic jam just before Rohtang due to the heavy snow under which the whole place was covered. The riding conditions were really tough as the roads were covered with one feet of snow. Surprisingly that was the first time I ever experienced an AMS – Acute Mountain Sickness, which my other friends did too. While crawling through the traffic a personal competition between Aman and Ammy started – who would fall more times and Ammy won 5-3!
Theog

How To Reach Theog

Book Theog Tour Package

Your Enquiry has been sent successfully