World’s Most Dangerous Walkway Now Open to Public. Dare to Explore?

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Photo of World’s Most Dangerous Walkway Now Open to Public. Dare to Explore? by Ragini Mehra

Precarious, massive, terrifying, incredible – such terms have often been used to describe El Caminito del Ray, once the world's most dangerous walkway. It is situated 100 meters above a flowing river in El Chorro, a village located northwest of Málaga, Spain. Initially built for use by construction workers in 1905, the trail was officially inaugurated by King Alfonso XIII in 1921. Also known as The Kings’s Little Pathway, it was shut down in 2001 after a few accidents were reported. The 100-year old pathway has now been restored and is open to public again.

All set to begin the hike!

Photo of World’s Most Dangerous Walkway Now Open to Public. Dare to Explore? by Ragini Mehra

When we read about it just before our Spain trip last year, I could never imagine I would go for it. The thought of a sleek wooden walkway in a gorge, the trail winding through limestone cliffs, the river flowing 100 metres below the trail and the mandatory helmets which made it sound all the more scary gave me sleepless nights! As we approached our days in Málaga, my friends constantly tried to encourage me to do it because it really would have been a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

Overcoming fears...

Photo of World’s Most Dangerous Walkway Now Open to Public. Dare to Explore? by Ragini Mehra

Finally decided to go for it!

Photo of World’s Most Dangerous Walkway Now Open to Public. Dare to Explore? by Ragini Mehra

And so I decided to go for it! The fear factor took a back seat as soon as I took my first few steps and looked across the gorge to see the different shades of blue, exotic wildlife and much more. If you’re a nature lover, the El Caminito del Ray trek is a must on your Spain itinerary. It sure is a dizzy stroll but also a great way to enjoy the natural beauty around.

Stopping on our way to soak in the serene views.

Photo of World’s Most Dangerous Walkway Now Open to Public. Dare to Explore? by Ragini Mehra

About the Trek

The Caminito del Ray is a 3-kilometre long walk that offers a chance to spot exotic flora like aleppo pines, holm oaks, sabine junipers, Mediterranean fan palms, brooms and rockroses. If you’re lucky, you’ll also spot rare fauna, including the Egyptian vulture, griffon vulture golden eagle and honey buzzard. The walkway is about up close and personal encounters with wildlife, overcoming your fears, stunning photo opportunities and more.

The views are to die for!

Photo of World’s Most Dangerous Walkway Now Open to Public. Dare to Explore? by Ragini Mehra

How Much Will it Cost

We booked our tickets on the official website https://reservas.caminitodelrey.info/?lang=en and recommend anyone visiting Spain to do the same. A general ticket costs €10 and a guided tour costs €18.

How to Get There

The walkway is located 60 kilometres away from Málaga and we hired a cab from our homestay to get there. Travelling via the suburban trains is also a convenient and more economical way to reach the path. There are two trains daily at 10:05 a.m. (destination Ronda) and 4:48 p.m. (destination Sevilla Santa Justa) from Malaga's Maria Zambrano station to El Chorro. While going back you can take any of the three trains leaving at 9:33 a.m., 3:03 p.m. and 6:03 p.m.from El Chorro to Málaga. The train journey is 40 minutes long and costs €6.

Irrespective of the route you take, you’ll need to take a 1.5-kilometre walk through a cave to reach the beginning of the path. It is best to take a guided tour which takes you through the cave to the main entrance.

Beautiful views as you approach the end.

Photo of World’s Most Dangerous Walkway Now Open to Public. Dare to Explore? by Ragini Mehra

Adventure junkies looking for a never-before adrenaline rush are sure to have the time of their lives hiking the Caminito del Ray.

Do you have it in you to explore this pathway?

Glad we did it!

Photo of World’s Most Dangerous Walkway Now Open to Public. Dare to Explore? by Ragini Mehra
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