EYE 1/3 by Tripoto
Melissa Adams
Once headquartered in Vondelpark, the new center for this homage to international cinema perches like an ivory spaceship ready for launch on the northern bank of the Ij River. Its art-house movies and main-floor exhibitions have entry fees, but the interactive film displays in the basement are FREE. The striking facility houses four movie screening rooms, a museum shop and exhibit space. To reach it, take the free Buiksloterweg ferry behind Central Station. Before leaving, refuel with a plate of bitterballen and beer on tap, served in the eye-popping EYE Bar restaurant.
Melissa Adams
My recent visit to EYE Film Institute Netherlands revealed an homage to international cinema replete with interactive displays, perched like an ivory spaceship ready for launch on the northern bank of the river Ij. The striking facility, accessible via a free ferry from Central Station, houses four movie screening rooms, a museum shop and exhibit space currently showcasing “Fellini,” the master of post-war Italian cinema best known for La Strada, La Dolce Vita and 8½, through September 22. Topping the contemporary structure is the eye-popping EYE bar restaurant, where you can wash down a plate of bitter ballen with beer on tap while musing about cinematography against a backdrop of the watery Ij. On sunny days, a spacious terrace beckons for lunch or just contemplating the world of the moving image. The new location in Overhoeks, Amsterdam’s new urban district across the water from Central Station, replaces the Film Institute’s previous headquarters in Vondelpark.
Anvi
And EYE, the new film museum, is worth a visit not only for the aerodynamic zigzag of its architecture, but also for the private viewing pods, displays of hand - tinted silent movies, and great cinema programming.