Abode Bombay 1/undefined by Tripoto

Abode Bombay

Sonalika Debnath
Sourced from some of the city's oldest markets, art deco pieces dating back to the 20th century, have been curated especially for the hotel by architect & interior designer, Sian Pascale for Young Citizens. Almost all the furniture you see at Abode boasts of a quirky character. There are bedside tables inspired by chaat stands, floors made out of reclaimed Burma teak, bedroom lighting composed of hardwood lamp holders, created out of handmade ceramic lampshades and library shelves inspired by Bombay's roadside bookstores. Even the bedding, curtains etc have been sourced from vintage saris, or hand-woven by the charitable organisation WomenWeave.A really brief glimpse into the history of the propertyIn 1982, the Sham family took over the residence of David Sassoon, an erstwhile Bombay entrepreneur and turned it into a budget lodge called Regency Inn. The year of 2013 saw Abedin Sham, son of the then owner Essa Sham transform the inn into what is today, the boutique stay.Abode's system in general, is also extremely socially responsible. Their avant-garde air conditioning units reduce emissions and are built to be eco-friendly. In an initiative to empower local women, the car service that the hotel provides, is run entirely by them. Also in collaboration with a blind school, a lot of visually-impaired men and women have been employed by Abode, as massage therapists. And in their in-house shop, artisanal trinkets and other such things are crafted by local NGOs to provide monetary support.
Sonalika Debnath
Inside Bombay's first ever luxury boutique hotelIn the belly of blue horizons and sweeping beaches, and inside the refurbished 114-year-old Lansdowne House, lies Abode, an elegant blend of luxurious accommodation and minimalistic designs. Paying subtle homage to Bombay's dazzling past, the property is bursting with objects and styles that are evocative of a bygone era. Upon stepping into the lobby, one of the first things that come to view, is an imposing 19th century chandelier. Also, Abode's walls are adorned with illustrations of cyclewallahs and teapots, and a rack filled to the brim with Parle-G biscuits, that guests can take along with them (for free) when they leave the hotel to start their day.
Sonalika Debnath
Ideal forReputed to be an anti-chain hotel, Abode is perfect for both Mumbaikars looking for a weekend hideaway, and tourists in the search of a luxurious, comfortable stay, with just a touch of heritage.About the property