The Amritsar passiveness.

Tripoto
1st Dec 2012
Photo of The Amritsar passiveness. by Sagnik Basu

A bullet hole at the Jalianwala Bagh

Photo of The Amritsar passiveness. by Sagnik Basu

Jalianwala Bagh

Photo of The Amritsar passiveness. by Sagnik Basu

Mild beauty

Photo of The Amritsar passiveness. by Sagnik Basu
Photo of The Amritsar passiveness. by Sagnik Basu

Sad walls

Photo of The Amritsar passiveness. by Sagnik Basu

Maharaja Ranjit Singh

Photo of The Amritsar passiveness. by Sagnik Basu
Photo of The Amritsar passiveness. by Sagnik Basu
Photo of The Amritsar passiveness. by Sagnik Basu

Jalianwala Bagh

Photo of The Amritsar passiveness. by Sagnik Basu

Maharaja Ranjit Singh's summer place.

Photo of The Amritsar passiveness. by Sagnik Basu

A flashback.

Amritsar is a journey through the pages of Indian history books. How Indians fought for their freedom, how sikh leaders valiantly put their lives on the line and how beautiful man made structures have been uniting people for the past decades. Being here would raise doubt in your mind about India's diversity.

Amritsar is one of the most ancient and sacred cities of India. Abode of the famous Golden Temple, it is the centre of Sikh history and culture. Amritsar is also a prime and popular pilgrim destination in India. Visiting during Baisakhi would be a bonus, as the festival is the sikh version of Christmas as the city is wrapped with colours. Amritsar was once the gateway for people who travelled to India through overland route from Central Asia. But nowadays, the ancient city of Amritsar is remembered mostly by its grim political history.

Various historical and religious sites in Amritsar make it a prime travel destination. An outing to the Wagah checkpost on the Indo-Pakistan border has also become a popular tourist place in Amritsar. Neighbour Punjab is also a very possible detour.

Revise your history notes, before you step in!

Floating at the end of a long causeway, the Golden Temple itself is a mesmerising blend of Hindu and Islamic architectural styles, with an elegant marble lower level adorned with flower and animal motifs in pietra dura work (as seen on the Taj Mahal). More shrines and monuments are dotted around the edge of the compound. Inside the main entrance clock tower, the Sikh Museum shows the persecution suffered by the Sikhs at the hands of Mughals, the British and Mrs Indira Gandhi. Unlike many historical sacred sites, the Golden Temple of Amritsar is still fully alive with religious fervor and sacredness, and visitors are welcomed to join in the experience. Although the building itself has great historical and architectural interest, it is the Golden Temple's great spiritual meaning for Sikh believers (and others) that is most memorable to visitors.
Photo of Harmandir Sahib, Amritsar, Punjab, India by Sagnik Basu
Constructed along the lines of the Golden temple, the temple is also called the Silver temple due to its carved silver doors. The temple has slowly gained prominence over the years, with pilgrims visiting the temple form both India and abroad. It is also known as the Durgiana, its name derived from the Hindu Goddess Durga. In close proximity to the Railway station and the Bus stand, the Durgiana Mandir owes its existence to Guru Shai Mal Kapoor, a religious leader who proposed the idea of the temple. It is his statue in a sitting position that stands immortalised outside the main temple entrance, also called the Darshani Deori. Pandit Madan Mohan Malviya laid the foundation stone of the temple in the year 1924, on the occasion of Ganga Dashmi.
Photo of Durgiana Mandir, Amritsar, Punjab, India by Sagnik Basu
Bone chilling historical evidence. Stepping inside this 'garden' would run a chill down your spine. The place witnessed over 300 hundred deaths in the hands of Reginald Dyer's men, who started shooting at innocent Indians, without any warning. Inidans went frenzy after this inhuman act and widespread protest flamed across the nation. Some historians argue the episode was a decisive step towards the end of British rule in India. Not to scare you off, this place is a must visit. Jalianwala Bagh is a vast garden spread over to an extent of 6.5 acres and the most conspicuous structure in the garden is the memorial of the 1919 massacre victims. The memorial also preserves the portion of the wall with pellet marks along with the well.
Photo of Jallianwala Bagh, Amritsar, Punjab, India by Sagnik Basu
You will be witnessing the household of the Sikh Empire's founder. A great fighter and an extraordinary leader. Right next to this museum stands the beautiful Maharaja Ranjit Singh Panorama, which is an eternal visual record which encapsulates the life of the Maharaja. All this is packed in a huge circular and two storied building which highlight the superb painting that gloriously convey the stories of his battles. All this is punctuated with several figures that render the place a new dimension; all this is supported by a multimedia exhibition depicting the scene of war. Some other things that are worth noticing here are several huge and paintings of real life size. Along with that there are dioramas which feature the life and times of the great Maharaja himself. One thing that is highlighted is a court scene of the erstwhile metropolis of Lahore. The latter is a likeness of a painting by the Astro-Hungarian artist, August Schoefft; also called ‘Court of Lahore’, it was completed it in 1852 and exhibited in Vienna for the first time in 1855.
Photo of Maharaja Ranjit Singh Museum, Amritsar, Punjab, India by Sagnik Basu
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