A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1)

Tripoto
2nd Aug 2011
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu
Photo of A rendezvous with Kalimpong! (Part 1) by Sagnik Basu

A sudden window from the monotonous school life and an unplanned trip to north is what we make of it.

Mission North Bengal.

Our first High School trip.

The humid city of joy forces you to break into sweat every single day, so no locations, no hotel booking, just backpacking.

Instead of starting from bottom and moving to the top we started with the scattered destinations of North Bengal and decided to finish it off with Kalimpong.

The hills, the jungles and the serene beauty of undulating tea gardens spread to the horizon. From the low lying agricultural fields to the high alpine mountains of Sandakphu, North Bengal is truly a treasure hunt for the nature lovers, especially for those who are looking for a periodical escape from the hectic chores of the modern city life. 
 

One of the only places in West Bengal that receive snow during winter. The idyllic green forests around Lava are ideal for picnics, trekking and bird watching. The road to Lava is untouched by modern life and tourists will find rustic hamlets whose inhabitants lead lives that have not changed for centuries. Wild animals such as the Himalayan bear and the barking deer are found in these parts. A Buddhist monastery is also located on one of the hills of Lava. Neora Valley National Park is located here which is famous for the Red Panda.
Photo of Lava Road, Deolo, Kalimpong, West Bengal, India by Sagnik Basu
This is a small town that is located at a distance of 12 km from Lava at an altitude of 5500 feet. Kafer, which is about 4 km away from the town offers a panoramic view of the Kanchenjunga. A special mention for Jhandi Dara, as the place would be carved in your memory for it's spectacular sunrise. Lolegaon is a fabulous destination for the lovers of wildlife in their natural habitat. The age-old forest of towering pine, cypress and oaks with their mossy trunk is an ideal place for watching endangered Himalayan species like black bear and mountain goats, numerous colourful birds and butterflies and rare orchids. The Heritage Forest at 10 minutes walking distance is the place to feel the exquisite wealth that nature has showered here. The hanging foot bridge over the canopy of huge trees is a special attraction. Popularly known as 'The Canopy Walk' it offers an unforgettable experience, which allows you to get close to the trees. Lolegaon offers some exciting short treks in the remote kalimpong hills. A day trek to Samthar or Relly in the unseen lower Himalayas can be a real opportunity to know the different aspects of lives in Indian countryside.
Photo of Lolegaon, West Bengal, India by Sagnik Basu
The town, which is located on a ridge, commands a panoramic view of the Kanchenjunga and the Himalayan mountains. The town is divided into two parts, Upper Pedong and Lower Pedong. Pedong lies on the historic Silk Road that connects India to Lhasa via the Jelepla Pass. A historical fort built in 1690 AD by the Lepchas, Damsang Gadi. But what is left of it are only in the form of ruins and debris. Later used to ward of the force of the East India Company, it was at the centre of the long-standing feud with the Dukpas of Bhutan. Established around the early 1700 AD Sangchen Dorjee Monastery provides historical insight into the history and culture of the place. It has now become the centre of Shabdrung Rimpoche (known as the Dharma Raja of Bhutan).
Photo of Pedong, West Bengal, India by Sagnik Basu
Be the first one to comment