Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad

Tripoto
11th Sep 2015
Photo of Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad 1/18 by Debabrata Nayak
The entrance of Ajanta
Photo of Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad 2/18 by Debabrata Nayak
The Ajanta caves
Photo of Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad 3/18 by Debabrata Nayak
Gautam Buddha
Photo of Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad 4/18 by Debabrata Nayak
The Ajanta caves
Photo of Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad 5/18 by Debabrata Nayak
The Ajanta caves
Photo of Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad 6/18 by Debabrata Nayak
The Ajanta caves
Photo of Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad 7/18 by Debabrata Nayak
Reclining Buddha, The Ajanta caves
Photo of Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad 8/18 by Debabrata Nayak
The Ajanta caves
Photo of Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad 9/18 by Debabrata Nayak
Bibi ka maqbara
Photo of Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad 10/18 by Debabrata Nayak
The Ellora caves
Photo of Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad 11/18 by Debabrata Nayak
The Ellora caves
Photo of Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad 12/18 by Debabrata Nayak
The Ellora caves
Photo of Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad 13/18 by Debabrata Nayak
Kailash Temple, The Ellora caves
Photo of Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad 14/18 by Debabrata Nayak
Devgiri, Daulatabad Fort
Photo of Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad 15/18 by Debabrata Nayak
Devgiri, Daulatabad Fort
Photo of Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad 16/18 by Debabrata Nayak
Devgiri, Daulatabad Fort
Photo of Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad 17/18 by Debabrata Nayak
Devgiri, Daulatabad Fort
Photo of Aura of Alamgir in Aurangabad 18/18 by Debabrata Nayak
Mhaismal Hill station

As Dalai Lama said "Once a year go someplace, you've never been before". And those places fascinates me which are of historical importance. If you combine first two statements, one place which will come to your mind is Aurangabad. Aurangabad, Maharashtra is situated at 500 km from Vadodara, Gujarat. It is better known for the reign of Mughal emperor Aurangzeb (Alamgir).

One fine Friday evening after the office hours, we headed towards this beautiful city. Entering the Maharashtra border from Gujarat was not soothing as there were lot of potholes in the road. Thanks to our Innova! which ensured us a hassle-free journey. It can't be more refreshing than having Poha and Chai in Maharashtrian style for breakfast. Our first destination on Saturday morning was Ajanta caves. 29 caves in a row! Unbelievable experience. Because some caves were under-construction, our expedition was limited to 15 caves. It took us 3 hours to complete the lively example of ancient age engineering. Next destination in our checklist was Bibi Ka Maqbara, which is 105 km from Ajanta. For those who have seen TajMahal before will not be actually disappointed to see this monument. It is equally well-maintained by Archaeological Survey of India. A smaller territory, but peaceful. Couple of hours is sufficient to see the beauty of this place. Slight rains in the evening worked as icing on the cake. We went to Panchakki. It is a small retreat to science lovers. I am not revealing anything here, but will encourage everyone to visit there at least once.

A long list of destinations was awaiting the next morning. We quickly rushed to our pre-booked hotel, Hotel Preetam. It is near to Aurangabad railway station was nice and comfortable. Early morning we got ready for Grishneshwar Jyotirlinga. The queue was not too high and we could finish our round of darshan in 2 hours. Adjacent to Grishneshwar is Ellora Caves. 34 caves! Mix of Jain, Buddhist and Hindu gods! Since we were running out of time, we skipped some of the caves in Ellora. We visited cave no. 31-34 and cave no. 16. Cave no. 16 is known as Kailash temple. The mammoth cave is a masterpiece and a must-see for every traveller. The scenic beauty of Hindu gods is mesmerizing. After spending couple of hours in the caves, we marched towards Deavagiri, popularly known as Daulatabad fort. The hill fort is 190 m from the plane. We reached at the top in 1 hour with stops in between. The top view will give you a complete view of Aurangabad city. The historical journey ends here as we moved to Mhaismal Hill Station. It's a small hill station, but at a high altitude of 1067 m. The cool breeze took away all of tiredness within seconds. With light rains in the morning, the evening weather was well established. While returning, we visited Mughal emperor Aurangzeb's tomb in Khuldabad. Aurangzeb ka mazhar is a very peaceful place where along with Aurangzeb, there are tomb of Aurangzeb's son and daughter.

This brings us to an end of our trip. This trip is as special as any other trips of mine. Highly memorable! and I recommend all my fellow travellers not to miss any of these places as someone rightly said "Better to see something once, than to hear about it a thousand times".

A take-home suggestion: do not wear shoes for visiting Ajanta and Ellora caves, as you will be wasting time removing and wearing every time at each cave. However, Daulatabad fort strictly needs shoes if you wish to climb up the fort.

The Ajanta Caves are a series of 29 Buddhist cave temples in Ajanta, India, some of which date from the 2nd century BC. Encompassing both Theravada and Mahayana Buddhist traditions, the Ajanta caves preserve some of the best masterpieces of Buddhist art in India.

Photo of Ajanta Caves, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak
Photo of Ajanta Caves, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak
Photo of Ajanta Caves, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak
Photo of Ajanta Caves, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak
Photo of Ajanta Caves, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak
Photo of Ajanta Caves, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak
Photo of Ajanta Caves, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak
Photo of Ajanta Caves, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak

Would you believe if one were to tell you that India is the proud home of not one but two Taj Mahals? Probably not! But it is a fact that a monument identical to the Taj stands in Aurangabad in Maharashtra and it is lovingly called the Mini Taj of the Deccan. The monument is Bibi Ka Maqbara built by Aurangzeb’s son, Azam Shah, in 1660 as a loving tribute to his mother, Dilras Bano Begam. Interestingly, while the Begum nestles in the magnificent structure, the austere Moghal emperor chose to be laid in and commemorated with touching simplicity. Aurangzeb’s tomb is also in Aurangabad at Khuldabad en route Daulatabad Fort. It is a simple latticed enclosure with whitewashed walls, a small marble railing, erected 200 years later, and a tomb marked by the white cotton sheet spread over it to delimit the modesty of his desires.

Photo of Bibi Ka Maqbara, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak

This city is named after Mughal Emperor Aurangazeb. It was called Fatehpur before it took its present name. This city is gateway to the World Heritage Sites of Ajanta and Ellora caves. Developed as a modern city, Aurangabad provides all comforts and modern facilities.

Photo of Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak

Panchakki (water mill) takes its name from the mill which used to grind grain for the pilgrims. This monument located in Aurangabad, displays the scientific thought process put in medieval Indian architecture. The complex of Panchakki had been a place of external abode of the great Sufi Saints who gathered to India in 12th Cent A.D. The Panchakki, is a calm and peaceful place that visualizes the life that existed in the medieval period. Visitors having sensitive imagination may hear the beats of drum and the humming noise of the people moving around the complex. The water flows down through clay pipes based on the Siphon System from the distance of 11 km. This marvelous water mill wax designated to generate energy to turn the large grinding stone, serving as a flour mill. The Panchakki with all its glories and enchantments has a unique place in the history.In fact it was the residance of populer saint “Baba Shah Musafir ". The panchakki has its own underground water channel, having the source some where towards the North of the city about 8 Kms. away in the mountains. The construction of this water channel from the main source to the Panchakki was started during the life time of saint “Baba Shah Musafir " some time in the year 1624 A.D. The complete water channel is made up of earthen pipes finely lined up and at appropriate distances, masonry pillars are erected which serve as natural suction pumps to make the water flow through the pipes with force through the distance of 8 Kms. Finely, the water rises " syhonically " to a huge elevated masonry pillar from where it falls down into the main tank to make an attractive "Water Fall".

Photo of Panchakki, Nagsenvan, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak

“Blessed by VerulNagar, there is no other place like it on this earth, where Lord Grishneswara resides, the best palce on this earth.” – Madhwamunishwar On this holy pilgrimage of the JyotirLingas of Lord Shankara, the last one, with out which the pilgrimage will not be considered as complete, is the twelfth JyotirLinga, of Grishneshwar. About 30 km towards the west side of Aurangabad, there is a village called Verul. In this village there is a place of pilgrimage called Shivalay, when the great Holy Trilinga of Ghrishneshwar is located. The stories associated with Verul, Shivalay and Ghrishneswar are like this: This was originally a settlement of the Naga tribes. The place of the Nagas is Bambi, which is known as “Varul” in Marathi “Varul” gradually changed into “Verul” and is known by this name only. River Yelaganga flows here. The name “Verul” is derived from Yelaganga, on whose banks the village is located. There was a king by the name “Yela” here. The capital of his kingdom was Yelapar, or Yelur or Verul.

Photo of Grishneshwar Jyotirlinga Temple, Grishneswar temple Road, Verul, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak

The Ellora Caves are an impressive complex of Buddhist, Hindu and Jain cave temples built between the 6th and 10th centuries AD near the ancient Indian village of Ellora. The caves have a slightly less dramatic setting than those at Ajanta, but more exquisite sculptures. Ellora is a World Heritage Site and the most visited ancient monument in Maharashtra State.

Photo of Ellora Caves, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak
Photo of Ellora Caves, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak
Photo of Ellora Caves, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak
Photo of Ellora Caves, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak
Photo of Ellora Caves, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak

Once known as 'Devgiri', this magnificent 12th century fortress stands on a hill just 13 kms from Aurangabad. It was given the name Daulatabad, the 'city of fortune', by Muhammad Tughlaq, Sultan of Delhi. Initially a Yadav stronghold, it passed through the hands of several dynasties in the Deccan. One of the world's best preserved fort of medieval times, surviving virtually unaltered, Daulatabad yet displays the character that made it invincible

Photo of Devagiri Daulatabad Fort, Daulatabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak
Photo of Devagiri Daulatabad Fort, Daulatabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak
Photo of Devagiri Daulatabad Fort, Daulatabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak
Photo of Devagiri Daulatabad Fort, Daulatabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak

Mhaismal, a small and charming hill station, is 39 kilometers north of Aurangabad City is nearest from Khuldabad or Ellora Caves. It is at the height of 1067 meters in the Sahyadri ranges. Girija Bhavani Temple here is very famous and the devotees in thousands throng here regularly.

Photo of Mhaismal Hill Station, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak

The important structures in and around Khultabad are Aurangazeb’s Tomb, Tombs of Azam Shah and his wife, Zain-ud-din’s Dargah, Burhan-ud-din’s mausoleum, Tombs of Asaf Jah and Nasir Jang, Bani Begum’s maqbara, Khan Jahan’s Lal Bagh, Dargah of Malik Ambar, Tombs of Tana Shah, Zar Zari Baksh, and other miscellaneous tombs.

Photo of Tomb of Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb, Khuldabad, Maharashtra, India by Debabrata Nayak
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